Academics
Areas of Study

Overview

The Business Administration program provides a foundation in business administration to prepare students for entry-level management positions in either the private or public sector. Minoring in business administration is an excellent choice for students with management and leadership potential who choose to major in a liberal arts discipline.

Courses & Requirements

Summary of Requirements

2022-2023
Core Curriculum 43
Pre-Major Courses 9
Major and Required Courses 72
Free electives 0
TOTAL 124

The Business Administration program provides a foundation in business administration to prepare students for entry-level management positions in either the private or public sector. Minoring in business administration is an excellent choice for students with management and leadership potential who choose to major in a liberal arts discipline.

Requirements for a Major in Business Administration

Students must be accepted into the Business Administration major before taking 300-level or above courses in the Department of Business. Students must also complete two of the following concentrations (Management, Marketing, Economics, Finance, International Business or Entrepreneurship). For continuation in the major, a student must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 in major and non-major courses. A business major must complete at least one internship in the field prior to graduation.

 

Required pre-major courses 6 (9*) hours

MAT 102: *Three hours count toward the general education Math requirement

This course surveys the fundamentals of business administration, including management, organizational behavior, marketing, economics, statistics, management information systems, accounting, finance, entrepreneurship, international business, and ethics & social responsibility. It is intended both for students who seek a one-time exposure to business as well as those planning to major in a Department of Business program.

This course and lab equip students to function in the information society. It introduces students to the current Windows environment and Microsoft Office Suites as they are ubiquitous in today's workplace and personal computing environment. Through hands-on training, students will learn basic skills in Word (word processing), Excel (spreadsheet), Access (database), and PowerPoint (presentation). In addition, file management, Browser, and E-mail basic skills will be practiced.

Basic concepts of probability and statistics, and applications to the sciences, social sciences, and management. Probability, conditional probability, Bayes Formula, Bernoulli trials, expected value, frequency distributions, and measures of central tendency. Credit will not be allowed for MAT 102 if student has previously passed MAT 130; 102 will not be counted toward a major in the department.

This course provides a survey of the algebra topics necessary for Calculus. Topics covered include the analysis of graphs of basic functions, transformations of graphs, composition of functions, inverse functions, quadratic functions and their graphs, polynomial and rational inequalities, absolute value inequalities, radicals and fractional exponents, exponential and logarithmic functions and equations, exponential growth and decay problems, and the analysis of circles, parabolas, ellipses, and hyperbolas. MAT 125 consists of the first half of MAT 130. Passing both MAT 125 and 126 is equivalent to passing MAT 130.

Required core courses 54 hours

This course introduces students to basic financial accounting theory and practice. It teaches students the knowledge and tools to identify and record business activities and to prepare and interpret financial statements and reports in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. Students will learn how accounting methods affect the evaluation of business results and the quality of business decisions.

As the second part of introduction to Financial Accounting, this course provides a detailed coverage of long-term liabilities, long-lived assets, stockholder's equity, investments, cash flows, and financial statement analysis. Special topics such as payroll accounting, accounting for partnership, and other related topics are also covered.

Management (or Managerial) Accounting comprises financial and nonfinancial information intended to meet internal users' needs. It involves the development and interpretation of accounting information intended to assist management in the operation of the business. Topics include financial statement analysis and the use of accounting information for planning and control, performance evaluation, and decision-making. The course will cover cost behavior, job order costing, process costing, cost volume-profit relationship, relevant costing/benefits, budgeting, activity-based costing, cash flow and financial statement analysis. Computer lab is required.

This course explores the major functions of management: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. Within these four functions are subjects such as self-management, organizational structure and culture, leadership, motivating employees, teamwork, human resource management, self-management, change management, and planning and decision-making tools and techniques. This course takes an inside out approach, where the student learns first about themselves and then develops their ability to manage progressively larger and more diverse groups of people and projects.

This course examines the basic principles of marketing and provides the opportunity to develop the critical analysis and management skills needed by successful marketers. Within the framework of the ''product, price, promotion, distribution, and customer'' elements of marketing, course topics include market segmentation, targeting, positioning, consumer behavior, integrated marketing communication, marketing ethics and social responsibility, and the global dimensions of marketing (including e-marketing).

This course focuses on statistical concepts and their application to businesses. It provides opportunities to develop fundamental skills in quantitative research, presentation, and critical analysis applicable to the business environment. Topics include quantitative and graphical descriptive techniques, data collection and sampling, probability distributions, estimation techniques, inferential and regression analysis.

This course is cross-listed and is otherwise known as PHI 341. This course introduces students to the normative theories of moral philosophy and how they apply to the business world. It covers a spectrum of topics in the subjects of conflict of interest, corporate ethics and climate, discrimination, ethical climate, ethical decision-making, ethical issues, and ethical standards. Students will use case studies and current events to critically analyze common ethical issues in the business environment and recommend appropriate courses of actions.

This course examines the basic principles of financial management and provides opportunities to develop basic quantitative, research, and critical analytical skills that are useful to a financial manager. Topics include financial managerial functions and responsibilities, risk/return trade-off, ethics and social responsibility, taxation issues, financial institutions and economic environment, interest rate analysis, financial statement analysis, time value of money, and valuation techniques.

This course focuses on the global dimensions of business. It covers a broad spectrum of subjects in foreign direct investment and trade, international cooperate strategies, international governance and regulation, international patents and protections, and multinational culture. The political, cultural, institutional, economic, legal, and technological environmental forces that accompany global business activities are discussed in an integrated manner.

This course introduces students to the American business legal environment and covers basic concepts in contracts, the uniform commercial code, corporations and partnerships, agency, intellectual property, employment, antitrust, consumer protection, security regulation, environmental and international law, and business ethics and social responsibility.

An introduction to data and information processing concepts and systems viewed from a contemporary management perspective. The course provides the conceptual foundations in understanding technologies, such as computer hardware and software, the Internet, networking, security, enterprise computing, e-commerce, database management, and how information systems support business functions. The hands-on labs enable students to develop in-demand skills in business analytics and data management.

Business analytics encompasses the skills, technologies, and practices for continuous iterative exploration and investigation of past business performance to gain insight and drive business planning. This course prepares students to interpret data to inform business decisions, recognize trends, detect outliers, summarize data sets, and analyze relationships between variables, etc. Beginning with basic descriptive statistics and progressing to regression analysis, students will implement analytical techniques using software tools, such as Excel, and apply fundamental quantitative methods to real business problems. Selected major-specific projects will be used to enable students to apply functional knowledge and skills associated with their respective major.

This course examines the production phase of business activities. It covers a broad spectrum of subjects in continuous improvement, cost control, data analysis tools, and quality management. Students will learn to analyze and apply methods of design and operation of production systems.

This course, the first of the two-course Senior Capstone sequence, serves to review and reinforce all business functional knowledge in the areas of marketing, finance, accounting, operations/production management, human resources management, organizational behavior, ethics, legal business environment, macro- and micro-economics, global dimensions of business, information management systems, quantitative research techniques and statistics, business leadership, integration, and strategic management. The class will use a hybrid instructional platform which utilizes both online self-paced eLearning and onsite lectures and discussions.

This is the second course of the senior capstone series. It is designed for graduating seniors majoring in Accounting, Business Administration, and Risk Management to synthesize, apply, and integrate all business functional knowledge and their major-specific expertise to solve complex problems in a real and virtual business environment. A variety of instructional techniques such as case studies, simulations, team projects, guest speakers, and field trips may be used to deliver an enhanced capstone experience. Through simulations,students will emulate top corporate executives to develop and implement strategy plans and business policies in a competitive, global business environment.

This course introduces students to the study of economics and provides an overview of common macroeconomic concepts. The course encourages students to understand, use, and analyze common macroeconomic concepts such as inflation, employment, consumption, national income, money, and interest rates, as well as the fundamental economic concepts of supply and demand, marginal analysis, and opportunity costs.

This course provides an overview of common microeconomic concepts. The course encourages students to critically analyze common microeconomic concepts such as supply and demand, prices, markets and market structure, competition, utility, production costs, marginal analysis, and opportunity costs. The underlying theoretical basis for these concepts and how they are interrelated with each other and with the overall economy is also introduced in this course.

Study and intensive practice of professional writing skills and genres, such as resumes, letters of application, emails, memos, short proposals and reports.

Business Administration concentration electives (any two for a total of 18 hours)

Business Administration majors must complete two of the following six concentrations by taking three of the required and elective courses listed for each concentration. At least one course for each concentration must be a Department of Business course. Courses marked with "*" have prerequisites that must be taken in their home departments. Prerequisites for courses offered by other departments that do not have "*" will be waived for business students taking them to satisfy their concentration. Students can also take special topics courses, in consultation with their advisors, to satisfy the requirements of their chosen concentrations. An elective course cannot count toward two different concentrations.

Concentration in Entrepreneurship 9 hours

Choose three:

This course is a non-traditional hands-on introduction to the world of entrepreneurial thinking that aligns with students' personal interests and aspirations. In this highly interactive and dynamic course, students are exposed to the various activities necessary to launch a successful business or organization. Students will work in small teams to consult for local and regional businesses. Business challenges will be presented to the students in the beginning of the semester and students will learn and utilize the Business Model Canvas to brainstorm ideas and engage in the customer discovery process. Additional field trips, seminars, and other out of class opportunities will be offered throughout the semester.

Social entrepreneurship is the quest to improve social justice through setting up a business that focuses on social change instead of profit. The goal is to develop a sustainable, effective, and empowering solution that does not depend on charity. In addition, this method enables social justice pioneers a way to support themselves financially at the same time they pursue their dreams to change the world. Students will develop a deeper understanding of social justice as well as business models and hands-on entrepreneurial skills that have the potential to effect change in a sustainable way. The classroom experience will be enhanced by guest speakers and field trips.

The course is for students who are interested in learning how to create, develop and manage a new product. This course introduces the models, tools, and research techniques used in the new product development process of a business. The topics covered in this course include opportunity identification, idea generation, product design, concept and prototype testing, segmentation and positioning, pricing, brand naming, promotional strategy, product launch, and post-launch evaluation.

The course is the application of basic financial management techniques focusing on the financial aspects of starting and running a business. The core financial aspects of business entrepreneurship and problems encountered by those starting and running a small business are covered through the discussion of financial topics, including working capital management, time value of money, financial statements, small business administration programs, succession planning, financing options, and alternative solutions to commonly discovered problems.

This course examines current theories about entrepreneurship and reviews the fundamental areas of business administration that every entrepreneur should know, including management, marketing, accounting, finance, and policy and strategic planning. The structure and purpose of a business plan are covered in detail.

Concentration in Economics 9 hours

This course expands and builds upon previous macroeconomic knowledge learned in introductory macroeconomics study. The course emphasizes the depth and breadth of the workings of the macroeconomic system through classroom examination and research, and by providing students with the experience of critically applying these concepts as they are related to current national and world events. Issues in monetary policy, employment and unemployment, inflation, aggregate demand and supply, and economic growth, and their interrelationships and policy implications are stressed. The study of these topics is structured in a manner that will serve as models for the types of analyses required in many post-graduate employment and graduate study environments.

This course expands and builds upon previous microeconomic knowledge learned in introductory microeconomics study. The course emphasizes the depth and breadth of the microeconomic system through classroom examination and research, and by providing students with the experience of critically applying these concepts as they are related to current national and world events. Issues in fiscal and business policy, the competitive environment, regulation, the utilization of supply and demand, profit maximizing behavior, production and costs, and their interrelationships and policy implications are stressed. The study of these topics is structured in a manner that will serve as models for the types of analyses required in many post-graduate employment and graduate study environments.

This course focuses on the history of economic ideas. It covers the major schools of thought in economics, beginning with mercantilism and moving through supply-side economics. Emphasis will be placed on the classical underpinnings of economics as currently practiced. The theories of Smith, Ricardo, and Malthus will lead into discussions of other economic thinkers, including Marx and Keynes.

Monetary standards, theories, and controls in relation to business cycles and full employment; credit, domestic, and foreign exchange; the nature of banking operations; the organization of a bank, the clearinghouse system; and the Federal Reserve System.

The distribution of natural resources among nations; factors responsible for major movements in international trades; tariffs and other trade restrictions; means of promoting free trade.

An intensive study of the different economic systems in the modern world and their adaptations in various countries. Implications for the future of these systems are discussed.

This course covers research techniques, data collection, hypothesis formulation, and application of research methods to specific problems in economics. Also included are practical exercises in presenting economic research to the wider audience.

This course will provide the foundations for economic analysis within the public context. Included will be the study of spending and tax policy within the government as well as the economic policy affecting individuals and groups within the reach of the government.

Concentration in Finance 9 hours

Required Course (3 hours)

A course that examines the principles of financial investing and provides opportunities to develop basic quantitative, research, presentation, and critical analytical skills that are useful to an investor. Topics include analysis of the investment environment, tools and mechanics of investing (debt instruments, government and municipal securities, common stock, real estate), portfolio construction and management, dealing with securities markets, tax issues in investing, research strategies, financial statement analysis, and risk/return trade-off analysis. This course incorporates student management of an actual investment fund that is a component of Gallaudet University's endowment.

Elective Courses (6 hours)

The course is the application of basic financial management techniques focusing on the financial aspects of starting and running a business. The core financial aspects of business entrepreneurship and problems encountered by those starting and running a small business are covered through the discussion of financial topics, including working capital management, time value of money, financial statements, small business administration programs, succession planning, financing options, and alternative solutions to commonly discovered problems.

This course addresses additional legal topics required for certification as a certified public accountant, including debtor and creditor relations, negotiable instruments, real property, trusts, wills and estates.

This course covers the major aspects of real estate finance and investment from the perspective of corporate, private, and public owners; investors; and users. Commercial properties will be emphasized. The course begins with an overview of the fundamentals of income producing real estate and builds on these concepts as we consider the forces that influence the cyclical, fragmented, and inherently local business of real estate investment. The course will expose students to current ¿real world¿ real estate finance and investment situations.

Monetary standards, theories, and controls in relation to business cycles and full employment; credit, domestic, and foreign exchange; the nature of banking operations; the organization of a bank, the clearinghouse system; and the Federal Reserve System.

The distribution of natural resources among nations; factors responsible for major movements in international trades; tariffs and other trade restrictions; means of promoting free trade.

This course covers research techniques, data collection, hypothesis formulation, and application of research methods to specific problems in economics. Also included are practical exercises in presenting economic research to the wider audience.

This course will provide the foundations for economic analysis within the public context. Included will be the study of spending and tax policy within the government as well as the economic policy affecting individuals and groups within the reach of the government.

This course emphasizes the applications of the following topics in Business and Social Sciences: Functions and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, limits and continuity, and differentiation and integration in one and several variables. Credit will not be allowed if student has passed MAT 150. This course will not be counted toward a major in the department.

Limit processes, including the concepts of limits, continuity, differentiation, the natural logarithm and exponential functions, and integration of functions. Applications to physical problems will be discussed.

Concentration in International Business 9 hours

The course studies how accounting is practiced in different countries around the world, and students will learn to compare the differences in financial reporting, taxation and other accounting practices that exist across countries. As business becomes more global, an understanding of these differences and efforts to harmonize differing accounting standards grow in importance. The course deals with both cultural issues and accounting issues having the greatest differences between nations.

The course provides a foundation to understand the various issues that affect a business when expanding to the global marketplace. These include geographical, historical, cultural, political/legal, economic, and transnational environments of business, as well as an introduction to foreign exchange rates and economic integration. This course is intentionally structured to promote multi-cultural understanding and personal transformation. Teaching methods will include instructor-led dialogue, group discussions, role plays, and peer feedback on your work, which have been demonstrated to encourage greater multicultural understanding, respect and appreciation.

This course focuses on the history of economic ideas. It covers the major schools of thought in economics, beginning with mercantilism and moving through supply-side economics. Emphasis will be placed on the classical underpinnings of economics as currently practiced. The theories of Smith, Ricardo, and Malthus will lead into discussions of other economic thinkers, including Marx and Keynes.

The distribution of natural resources among nations; factors responsible for major movements in international trades; tariffs and other trade restrictions; means of promoting free trade.

An intensive study of the different economic systems in the modern world and their adaptations in various countries. Implications for the future of these systems are discussed.

This course will explore the diverse political systems of the non-western world. Study will include established democracies such as India and Japan, political systems in transition to democracy such as Brazil, Mexico, and South Africa, and more authoritarian systems such as China. Students will be introduced to both theory and practice in these areas.

This course will introduce students to the history, politics and legal structure of the European Union. Among the topics to be covered will be: EU institutions, social policy, CAP, EU expansion, the EURO, the single market, EU foreign policy, and immigration policy.

An introduction to the basic factors, concepts, and theory of international relations. The objectives, methods, and capabilities of modern states and other international actors will be surveyed. A study will be made of the institutional forms of international relations, ideological orientations, and objectives. Emphasis will be on the trends and transformation of the international system during and after the Cold War.

This course is a basic introduction to international law and organization. Students will learn how international law is different from municipal law, how international law is made, the role of international law in domestic legal systems, specific rules of international law regarding sovereignty, recognition, nationality, human rights, war, and the law of the sea. The role of international organizations relating to the making of international law, the uniqueness of the European Union as a law-making body, and a brief introduction to the role of the UN, generally in the international system, will be discussed.

This course examines how work is related to societal and technological changes. Topics include long-term trends in the nature of work and the differences in work among major segments of the labor force, including differences by race, gender and disability. The course also examines how globalization is affecting work and workers in the United States as well as in selected other countries.

Concentration in Management 9 hours

Required Course (3 hours)

This course focuses on the successful planning, staffing, and management of personnel in small and large business organizations. Course topics include job design and organizational structure, recruitment and selection, legal issues (benefits, privacy, equal opportunity), and performance management. Special attention is paid to problems of successfully implementing human resource strategies at both the operating unit and corporate level. Through the use of case studies and real-world scenarios, the issues of workplace productivity, turnover, employee morale, and manager effectiveness are discussed.

Elective Courses (6 hours)

This course addresses additional legal topics required for certification as a certified public accountant, including debtor and creditor relations, negotiable instruments, real property, trusts, wills and estates.

In everyday life, we are interdependent with others and face many challenges in interpersonal and group situations. The difference or disagreements in perceptions, goals, needs, or interests can lead to conflicts. These conflicts can develop into positive situations that encourage creativity and new dimensions or they can devolve into negative situations that develop destructive and hurtful behaviors. Because such conflicts occur in daily life, it is important to understand the dynamics of conflict, use effective management techniques, and establish and maintain collaborative relationships. In this course we will use theoretical perspectives, case studies, personal experiences, journals, and class activities to examine the roots and nature of conflict, the styles and tactics used to deal with conflict, and the personal and group stakes in conflict. In addition, we will explore methods for analyzing and handling conflict, techniques for creating constructive conflict, uses of third-party interventions, and possibilities for forgiveness, reconciliation, and thinking of ''conflict as magic''.

This course prepares students to be effective communicators in the workplace and includes interviewing, professional presentations at staff meetings, business writing, and interaction with a variety of professionals.

The role of communication in complex organizations. Emphasis upon the role of communication styles of managers and employees in the creation of corporate culture. Dissemination of messages within and among divisions of organizations. Use of such diagnostic tools as the ICA Communication Audit to identify dysfunctional communication patterns.

This course includes concepts of event planning, management, leadership skills, and evaluation. This course is designed to develop students' familiarity with the special event program planning for recreation, physical education, and sports programming in diverse environments. Emphasis is placed on experiential learning through the actual planning and leadership of a community-based event within the Gallaudet or the greater deaf community, similar to a service-learning course.

This course provides students with a general overview of the business and administrative functions of non-profit and profit theatrical and performing arts organizations as well as an introductory look at the processes and responsibilities of production management, with specific consideration given to applications relevant to Deaf theatre practices. Open to non-majors.

Concentration in Marketing 9 hours

Required Course (3 hours)

This course examines ways that research methods and procedures are be used to obtain the information necessary for making sound strategic marketing decisions. Topics includes a review of marketing concepts, research ethics, research design (secondary data, qualitative data, observation, survey and experimentation), data acquisition and measurement, questionnaire design, sampling issues, and data analysis and findings. By performing group and individual marketing research projects, students learn how to write a research proposal as well as how to execute and present of complete marketing research study.

Elective Courses (6 hours)

Students learn and apply (1) the core strategies, principles and practices of effective advertising management; and (2) the strategies and tactics used to build, defend and sustain brands. The course utilizes theory, research, and practical application related to advertising and branding, including advertising design and evaluation, brand creation, and brand psychology. Topics include consumer segmentation and target selection, consumer motivation and insight, branding and technology, brand selection, communication strategies, and media planning.

The course is for students who are interested in learning how to create, develop and manage a new product. This course introduces the models, tools, and research techniques used in the new product development process of a business. The topics covered in this course include opportunity identification, idea generation, product design, concept and prototype testing, segmentation and positioning, pricing, brand naming, promotional strategy, product launch, and post-launch evaluation.

This course covers the principles and tools used by managers to develop effective marketing strategies in a variety of business environments. Among the topics discussed: market opportunity analysis, segmentation, targeting and positioning strategies, competitive analysis, barriers to entry, and marketing ROI. Current trends in marketing will also be discussed. Real world cases will be extensively analyzed in class, with students playing the role of marketing managers.

This course involves a critical study of the development, scope, influence, and theories of mass communication in America.

This course provides a broad overview of components of public relations in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. Students will examine the concept of public relations as an ongoing process. Students will be exposed to the basic knowledge, skills, strategies, and tools used by practitioners.

Program Outcomes

Accurately apply fundamental business concepts, models, and principles to address hypothetical or real-world business issues. (Common Business Knowledge & Inquiry)

 

Communicate effectively in both American Sign Language and written English in various formats and styles to a variety of audiences in multiple business contexts. (Communication)

 

Apply technological tools and statistical and quantitative reasoning skills in analyzing and evaluating numerical information to support evidence-based business decisions.(Quantitative Reasoning & Technological Skills)

 

Critically assess business problems and develop well-supported solutions.(Critical Thinking & Problem Solving)

 

Critically evaluate all business opportunities and challenges using a global business perspective.(Global Dimension)

 

Consistently act in a professional, ethical, and socially responsible manner, and collaborate effectively in teamwork when required.(Ethics & Social Responsibility)

Accreditation

The BS in Business Administration is accredited by the Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP), a leading specialized accreditation body for business education around the world.

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B.S. in Business Administration

Hollie Fallstone

Edward Miner Gallaudet (EMG) 210

202-250-2375

202-651-5312

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