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Audiology Open House

December 15 and 16, 2022 from 9 am to 3 pm (EST)

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Overview

Overview

Dr. Chizuko Tamaki, Program Director

Sorenson Language and Communication Center, Room 2217

The Clinical Doctoral Degree (AuD) education residential program in Audiology at Gallaudet University is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2200 Research Boulevard #310, Rockville, Maryland 20850, 800-498-2071 or 301-296-5700.

The Au.D. program is designed to produce audiologists who are able to function independently in all diagnostic and rehabilitative settings, serving individuals of all ages, including individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. The program offers an intensive, broadly based academic curriculum together with an integrated sequential clinical experience that starts in the first semester, culminating in the final year with a full-time immersive externship experience. The curriculum was developed in accordance with the recommendations and guidelines of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), the American Academy of Audiology (AAA), and the Academy of Rehabilitative Audiology (ARA).

In addition to providing a strong academic and clinical experience, the Gallaudet University Au.D. program has the unique charge of training audiologists who are proficient in American Sign Language (ASL) and are knowledgeable of Deaf Culture, and who have particular expertise in serving members of the Deaf community.

Academic and clinical instruction and coordination are led by 9 full-time faculty and clinical educators, with additional contributions from faculty members of the M.S. program in Speech-Language Pathology and the Ph.D. program in Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences, as well as faculty from other Gallaudet University departments. In addition, Gallaudet University’s Au.D. program benefits from having outstanding adjunct faculty, as well as high-quality clinical placements and internship preceptors in the metropolitan Washington, DC area.

Admissions Procedures

Applicants for the Au.D. in Audiology must complete the application process and meet the requirements for graduate study at Gallaudet University. Please visit the Graduate Admissions website for more information and a checklist of application requirements.
 

DEADLINE DATE
Last Date for Consideration of Application: February 1

Program Specific Requirements

Three Letters of reference

Interview

Recommended Undergraduate Major

Speech-Language Pathology

Audiology or related discipline

Communication Sciences/Disorders

Prerequisite Coursework

Physical Science (3 hrs)

Biology (3 hrs)

Statistics/Math (3 hrs)

Behavioral/Social Science (6 hrs)

Anatomy and Physiology of Speech/Hearing Mechanisms

Phonetics/Phonology

Speech Science/Acoustics

Normal Language Development

Intro to Audiology

Courses & Requirements

Summary of Requirements

Year I - Summer session (10+3 PST Credits)

Evaluation of research in audiology and related fields. The course describes how to read, understand, and evaluate research appearing in the literature, and provides an introduction to research design and scientific writing.

Study of basic physical properties of sound, including decibel notation, wave propagation, resonance, filtering, and the analysis of simple and complex signals. The course also includes study of the principles, procedures, and research involved in the field of psychoacoustics, including the relationships between the physical dimensions of sound and perceptual experience, as well as the relationships between psychoacoustic testing and both auditory physiology and the audiological evaluation process. This course also begins to connect these aspects of sound with acoustic phonetics, discussing changes in hearing acuity and how speech perception is altered. Using the foundation of the physical aspects of sound and psychoacoustics, this course discusses how hearing loss shapes auditory perception.

Anatomy and physiology of the auditory, vestibular, and central auditory nervous systems, including phylogeny, and genetics of hearing and balance; mechanical and biophysical factors in afferent and efferent signal transduction.

This course provides foundational principles of audiologic evaluation. The course is designed to provide students with the theoretical and evidence-based practice in basic audiologic evaluation, skills for which is developed in the Clinical Lab (HSL871).

This is a guided clinical lab course, allowing the students to gain hands-on experience to perform basic hearing evaluations, including but not limited to: otoscopy, acoustic immittance, and puretone audiometry. This course will prepare students for enrollment in HSL 872.

Year I - Fall semester (16+3 PST Credits)

Foundations of multicultural and multilingual issues in audiology and related fields. Course topics will include terminology and concepts to examine how cultural differences affect clinical assessment and intervention services for specific groups. This course will highlight etiologies of hearing disorders that differentially impact specific populations.

An introductory course to statistical analysis as well as ongoing research within the Audiology and related programs. Each student will complete an application to be placed in a research lab in which they will work for the subsequent 4 semesters.

This course will provide hands-on learning experiences through use of instrumentation in audiology. Lab exercises will familiarize students to audiologic instrumentation and provide opportunities to apply basic audiologic concepts to lab findings. Laboratory format also provides an introduction to scientific report writing using the APA format.

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of anatomy and physiology of the nervous system as it relates to the development of hearing, vision, thought, memory and emotions as well as the perception, processing and production of speech and language.

This course introduces students to evidence-based auditory (re)habilitation (AR) practices that address the communicative and biopsychosocial functioning across the lifespan of children and adults who have an acquired or congenital hearing loss. The course has a strong interdisciplinary focus, and comprehensively addresses multicultural, ethical and professional issues in AR. Special emphasis will be given to the audiologist's role in assessing function and providing effective rehabilitation services to families with deaf or hard of hearing children as well as working-age adults and seniors. A number of topics foundational to AR will be covered in this course including: acoustic phonetics as it relates to individuals with hearing loss, impact of hearing loss on biopsychosocial functioning of individuals, audiological counseling and the importance of cultural competence, assessment of individual AR needs, and group hearing aid orientation including speechreading and communication strategies.

The focus of this course is upon applying the principles of sign communication in the field of clinical audiology. Students will develop and demonstrate proficient sign language skills while performing the following clinical procedures: client interviewing/case history, walk-in service, assessing client communication skills and abilities, audiologic test interpretation, and instructional techniques for communication therapy.

This course builds on the basic audiologic evaluation principles discussed in HSL 831. Topics will include advanced consideration of pure-tone and speech audiometry, clinical masking, acoustic immittance battery, calibration and standards, behavioral site-of-lesion testing, OAEs, and various pathologies that affect auditory-vestibular systems.

Study of amplification systems and hearing aids, including hearing aid design, earmold acoustics, electroacoustic characteristics and specifications, real-ear verifications, validation, and orientation of hearing aid use.

Introduction to a variety of audiologic activities under the guidance of clinical supervisors, including structured participation in diagnostic evaluations and hearing aid services. The experience will expose students to audiologic evaluation, treatment, prevention/identification, as well as professional and culturally sensitive communication.

Candidacy Examination

Year I - Spring semester (16+3 PST Credits)

Students will develop interviewing and counseling skills to help patients and their families/caregivers address and cope with their feelings around hearing loss and communication-related needs. This course will provide theoretical frameworks, practical strategies, and personal reflection for providing services with cultural and linguistic awareness, knowledge, competency, and proficiency.

Continued focus upon the clinical application of principles of sign communication in the field of diagnostic audiology/aural rehabilitation. Emphasis will be placed on use of sign language for informal counseling of clients and instructional techniques for communication therapy.

Assessment of hearing in infants, toddlers, and difficult-to-assess individuals. Course topics include: development of auditory skills; review of normal motor, cognitive, language, and psycho-social development; abnormal development and genetics of childhood hearing loss; case history/interviewing; behavioral pure tone and speech audiometry including BOA, VRA, and CPA; diagnostic ectrophysiologic procedures, ABR and ASSR; identification audiometry including newborn hearing screening with ABR and OAE; and audiologic and parent counseling in pediatric clinical services. Ethnic and multicultural differences are immersed throughout the course.

This course covers the clinical basics of auditory electrophysiology. Focusing primarily on the acquisition of electric signals generated in response to auditory stimuli often used in clinical practice including electrocochleography (ECoG), auditory brainstem response (ABR) and middle latency response (MLR). Students will gain hands-on experience with these tests with a lab covering each of these electrophysiological techniques.

This course, together with HSL838, covers vestibular function, assessment, and management. A basic understanding of auditory diagnostics and peripheral vestibular anatomy is presupposed. Procedures and interpretation of videonystagmography will be covered in detail, in addition to introduction to various other vestibular evaluation and management techniques.

This course builds on the knowledge gained in Amplification I, and reviews candidacy and needs assessment, prescriptive methods, various hearing aid features, consideration for pediatric and other special populations, and added technologies to interface with hearing aids.

This course includes an overview of cochlear implants (CIs) and is designed to be a foundational course before students enroll in the Cochlear Implants II (HSL 848) course. This course reviews FDA candidacy for adult and pediatric populations, sound processing strategies and implant technology, assessment of outcomes including behavioral and electrophysiological measures, and a brief introduction to CI programming. An emphasis will be placed on discussion of current research on CI outcomes.

Working with a faculty member, students will initiate, continue, and/or close out ongoing research projects within their respective faculty member lab. This course is expected to include assessment of current research, writing grants and manuscripts, preparing presentations, and collection/analysis of data.

Continued practicum experience under the guidance of clinical supervisors, encompassing a variety of audiology services, with emphasis in audiologic evaluation and hearing aid services. Students will build on skills gained in HSL871, and will focus on synthesis, application, and flexibility of clinical knowledge.

Supervised experience in various specialty areas in audiology, such as aural rehabilitation, cochlear implants, vestibular and electrophysiology services.

Year II - Summer session (9 Credits)

The focus of this course is on evidence-based auditory (re)habilitation (AR) practices addressing the communicative and biopsychosocial functioning of children and adults who have acquired or congenital hearing loss and/or tinnitus across the lifespan. Special emphasis is given to the AR knowledge and skills needed by audiologists to assess function and provide effective rehabilitative services for families with deaf or hard of hearing infants and toddlers, children in educational settings, young adults, those in military service, veterans, working-age adults and seniors. The course has a strong interdisciplinary focus, and comprehensively addresses multicultural, ethical and professional issues in AR.

This course expands on the basic vestibular function, assessment, and management, to include variations across the lifespan, advanced assessment techniques, and the various treatment and management options.

This advanced amplification course focuses on strengthening students' ability to integrate their knowledge of current technologies with various client factors, and apply in clinical cases. Simulated cases will be used to illustrate and practice clinical application skills. An overview of implantable devices is also provided.

This course will continue from Cochlear Implants I (HSL 847) and include more detailed discussions of each topic covered in that course, with specific emphasis on electrophysiological measures and sound processing strategies, as well as an in-depth discussion of CI programming with a hands-on lab. This course will also include interactive discussions with clients and hearing professionals in the community.

Working with a faculty member, students will initiate, continue, and/or close out ongoing research projects within their respective faculty member lab. This course is expected to include assessment of current research, writing grants and manuscripts, preparing presentations, and collection/analysis of data.

Advanced diagnostic and aural rehabilitation practicum in 1) a rehabilitation or medical facility and 2) school programs for deaf and hard of hearing students (day classes and residential).

Year II - Fall semester (11-12 Credits)

Building from the topic established in Clinical Auditory Electrophysiology, this course expands to middle and long latency electrophysiological responses less often seen in clinical practice, but used in audiological and cognitive evaluation. This course covers slow cortical potentials, P300, N400/P600, and briefly introduces intraoperative monitoring. As with HSL 835, this course has a lab component, which focuses on acquisition and analysis of the P300 as elicited by auditory and visual stimuli.

This course will integrate the audiology students¿ knowledge and skills of auditory, visual, and vibrotactile receptive communication technologies designed to meet the needs of deaf and hard of hearing individuals as well as other populations, at home, in the workplace, in educational settings, and for recreational purposes. Communication technologies include systems to facilitate (1) face-to-face communication, (2) the reception of media, (3) telephone reception, and (4) the awareness of environmental sounds. Review and practice with actual volunteer clients of the needs assessment, selection, and verification process will be provided in two hands-on one-day workshops in the Gallaudet Assistive Devices Demonstration Center.

Oto-audiologic and neurologic considerations in the differential diagnosis of auditory and vestibular disorders.

Working with a faculty member, students will initiate, continue, and/or close out ongoing research projects within their respective faculty member lab. This course is expected to include assessment of current research, writing grants and manuscripts, preparing presentations, and collection/analysis of data.

Supervised experience in various specialty areas in audiology, such as aural rehabilitation, cochlear implants, vestibular and electrophysiology services.

Advanced diagnostic and aural rehabilitation practicum in 1) a rehabilitation or medical facility and 2) school programs for deaf and hard of hearing students (day classes and residential).

Comprehensive Exam (Oral and MC)

Year II - Spring semester (14-15 Credits)

This course will provide knowledge of central auditory processing disorders and how they are assessed and managed in home, school, work, and therapeutic environments. Areas to be addressed include differential diagnosis, the collaborative model, counseling, and advocacy. The course will have an interdisciplinary focus.

This course examines public school, community, industrial, and military hearing programs, including screening tests, noise control, and medical-legal problems associated with acoustic trauma and noise-induced hearing loss.

Causes, assessment, and management of tinnitus and hyperacusis, with emphasis on multi- and inter-disciplinary approaches.

The study of issues of professional importance that have not been addressed in other courses. The important issues will be those that are current at the time the course is taught; content will change from year to year.

Working with a faculty member, students will initiate, continue, and/or close out ongoing research projects within their respective faculty member lab. This course is expected to include assessment of current research, writing grants and manuscripts, preparing presentations, and collection/analysis of data.

Principles and practices of effective supervision/precepting/mentoring of students, other professionals, and support personnel. The course includes both didactic and experiential components.

Advanced diagnostic and aural rehabilitation practicum in 1) a rehabilitation or medical facility and 2) school programs for deaf and hard of hearing students (day classes and residential).

Year III - Summer Session (6 Credits)

The goal of this introductory and subsequent companion course is to ensure that students obtain the skills that will allow them to become autonomous, independent doctors of audiology, regardless of their work setting. Various aspects that pertain to establishing and managing an audiology practice will be covered, including: legal and ethical considerations, audiology in the insurance system including government and 3 rd party payer insurance, managed care, and coding and billing for audiology services.

This course provides students with full time experience, in hospital, private practice, clinical, educational, university, or other approved setting. The externship is to be completed under the supervision of audiologists holding current national certification and/or state licensure in audiology and approved by the department of Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences.

Year III - Fall semester (6 Credits)

This course is an extension to the Introductory course on this topic, covering additional areas related to private practice development and effective clinic management. Topics include: creating effective practice policies and procedures, developing a business plan, hiring and personnel management, establishing an effective marketing plan, and tracking key performance indicators. Knowledge of these and related areas will provide students with the foundational concepts that they will need to establishing a private practice or if they were to find themselves in clinical leadership positions.

This course provides students with full time experience, in hospital, private practice, clinical, educational, university, or other approved setting. The externship is to be completed under the supervision of audiologists holding current national certification and/or state licensure in audiology and approved by the department of Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences.

Year III - Spring semester (6 Credits)

Current and emerging topics in audiology. Topics are selected each semester, based on current trends, new research and technologies, political and healthcare landscape, and needs of the students.

This course provides students with full time experience, in hospital, private practice, clinical, educational, university, or other approved setting. The externship is to be completed under the supervision of audiologists holding current national certification and/or state licensure in audiology and approved by the department of Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences.

Year IV - Summer session (1 Credit)

This course provides students with full time experience, in hospital, private practice, clinical, educational, university, or other approved setting. The externship is to be completed under the supervision of audiologists holding current national certification and/or state licensure in audiology and approved by the department of Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences.

Program Outcomes

Graduates of the Au.D. Program should be able to communicate in a professional, culturally sensitive, and effective manner; via spoken, written, and sign languages; in advocacy, consultation, education, and administration.

 

Graduates of the Au.D. Program should be able to plan, perform, and evaluate programs for the prevention and identification of auditory and vestibular disorders.

 

Graduates of the Au.D. Program should be able to plan, perform, and evaluate assessments of individuals with suspected disorders of auditory, balance, communication, and related systems.

 

Graduates of the Au.D. Program should be able to plan, perform, and evaluate intervention of individuals with suspected disorders of auditory, balance, communication, and related systems.

 

Graduates of the Au.D. Program should be able to conduct clinically relevant research to support evidence-based audiological practice, including evaluation and interpretation of the current literature and planning and executing a hypothesis-driven study.

 

Accreditation

The Clinical Doctoral Degree (AuD) education residential program in Audiology at Gallaudet University is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2200 Research Boulevard #310, Rockville, Maryland 20850, 800-498-2071 or 301-296-5700.

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Au.D. in Audiology

Chizuko Tamaki

SLCC 2217

(202) 568-8766

(202) 651-5327

(202) 448-7144

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