Academics
Areas of Study

Overview

Overview

A Bachelors of Arts in Spanish consists of:

A minimum of thirty hours from courses numbered 200 and beyond in the Spanish field of study. One of these courses must be an internship or study abroad course (WLC 320 or WLC 210). One WLC course, other than the internship or study abroad course, may also satisfy three credits of this major requirement. Two general elective courses (outside the 30 required credits in the Spanish field) must be satisfied in another foreign language, written or signed.

Courses & Requirements

Summary of Requirements

2022-2023
Core Curriculum 43
Pre-major courses 8
Major and related courses 36-38
Free Elective courses 31-33
TOTAL 120

Required pre-major courses 8 hours

This is the first part of a two-semester course sequence. This course combines an intensive study of the principles of grammar and usage of the language with basic vocabulary building, reading, composition, and translation of elementary texts. A contrastive grammar approach will be incorporated, drawing upon elements of English and ASL. Students will also be exposed to aspects of the target culture(s), including information on Deaf communities abroad. When offered face to face, the course has four hours of classroom instruction plus an additional, required weekly hour in the department¿s Learning Laboratory. When offered on-line or as hybrid, the lab hour is part of the on-line component.

This is the second part of a two-semester course sequence. This course builds on the basic communicative skills developed in Spanish 111. It combines an intensive study of the principles of grammar and usage of the language, vocabulary building, reading, composition, and translation at the novice-mid/novice-high level. A contrastive grammar approach will be incorporated, drawing upon elements of English and ASL. Students will also be exposed to aspects of the target culture(s), including information on Deaf communities abroad. When offered face to face, the course has four hours of classroom instruction plus an additional, required weekly hour in the department's Learning Laboratory. When offered on-line or as hybrid, the lab hour is part of the online component.

Required Spanish courses 12 hours

This is one of two courses in the second year Spanish sequence. The main focus of this course is reading. The students will build on their knowledge of Spanish grammar, vocabulary, and culture through the reading of Spanish literary and non-literary texts of graded difficulty. A contrastive grammar approach will be incorporated, drawing upon elements of English and ASL.

Students will apply the knowledge of vocabulary and syntax acquired in Basic Spanish to a variety of printed, Web-based texts, or captioned films. Readings and films will be chosen for their cultural value, interest, and accessibility. Grammar and composition will be practiced within the context of the selected reading and film materials.

Composition and readings.

This is an advanced Spanish grammar and composition course. The students will acquire knowledge of advanced grammatical structures through the analysis of original contemporary Spanish and Latin American literary short fiction. A contrastive grammar approach will be incorporated, drawing upon elements of English and ASL.

Elective Spanish courses 13-17 hours

A minimum of two SPA courses at the 400 level. One WLC course, other than the internship or study abroad course, may also satisfy three credits of the major requirement.

The minimum number of elective credits will depend on how many credits the student needs to reach the minimum 30 credits for the major, upon completing the internship or experience abroad.

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for sophomores. Students may enroll in 295 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for juniors. Students may enroll in 395 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

A survey of Spanish literature from the 12th century through the Golden Age.

This course covers a survey of contemporary Spanish and Latin American Literature in the target language.

This advanced Spanish course provides a forum for Latinx heritage students to explore, analyze, and compare aspects of their own intersectionalities and experiences through the production of the students¿ own narratives and media and through the analysis of Spanish and bilingual Spanish-English literature and media by Latinx authors/film makers.

A survey of important aspects of Latin American society today, dealing with the major political, economic, and social structures of the various countries and areas and their impact on the everyday life of the people.

An introduction to the history, geography, art, and literature of Spain.

This course offers an introduction to the general trends of Mexican civilization and culture. The course surveys historical, economic, political and artistic developments of Mexico from pre-Columbian times to the present.

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for seniors who are majors or minors. Students may enroll in 495 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

Intensive supervised study and research on topics of the student's selection.

Special Topics in the discipline, designed primarily for sophomores. Students may enroll in 295 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

This course provides an introduction to the diversity of human language and the role of language in society. Students will apply basic lexicostatistic methodology to learn about the origins, the interrelationships, and the characteristics of some of the world's languages.

Comparative study of three of the largest Latino communities in the United States: Chicanos, Cuban-Americans, and Puerto Ricans. Topics will include an exploration of the cultural identities of each of these communities, focusing notions of ethnicity, race, religion, as well as economic and social class distinctions. Taught in English.

This course covers readings from the Medieval and Renaissance periods to Spain's Golden Age plays, Cervantes' Don Quixote, and exemplary novels of the 17th century. This course satisfies the humanities literature requirement.

This course covers readings from the 18th century to the modern works of the 20th century by Pardo Bazan, Perez Galdos, Blasco Ibanez, and Garcia Lorca. The course satisfies the humanities literature requirement.

This course is an introduction to the writings of U.S. Latino authors writing in English and/or in Spanglish. Through a close analysis of various genres (poetry, fiction, comic strips, interviews, art exhibits, and films), students will explore the contemporary experiences of U.S. Latinos of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Cuban descent, and how they are represented in American literature. Topics to be discussed include the construction of identities in terms of race, gender, class and sexuality, bilingualism and code-switching, the experiences of migration and exile, and the longing for a place to call home. As part of their learning experience, students will work in teams to develop a lesson plan to educate the community about U.S. Latino author.

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for juniors. Students may enroll in 395 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

Students will learn foreign language teaching and learning techniques and research methods for classroom application. In addition to acquiring knowledge of past language learning theories and principle methodologies, comparisons and discussions of those theories will be applied to current best practices in foreign language teaching and research as guided by the discipline's National Standards for Foreign Language. Learning developed by the national professional organization, the American Council on Foreign Languages. Learning outcomes include evaluation and assessment criteria, student review and the development of student-centered written class work through mentoring and collaboration with department faculty in the students' target language area.

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for seniors who are majors or minors. Students may enroll in 495 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

Intensive supervised study and research on topics of the student's selection.

Independent Study

Required internship or foreign study experience 1-5 hours

WLC 320: A maximum of five hours count toward the requirements for the major

Study abroad in a Spanish-speaking country. The study abroad component will focus on the study of the sign language of the host country through formal class instruction and immersion in the culture of its Deaf community. Classroom instruction will be complemented with guided visits to relevant museums, monuments, and other points of interest.

This junior-level course provides an effective way for students to integrate theory and practice. Students will apply knowledge, foreign language and cross-cultural skills gained in the classroom by interning at international organizations, agencies or schools in the U.S. or abroad for at least 10 weeks. Depending on the number of credit hours, students will be required to work a minimum total number of hours, and will fulfill the duties outlined in a learning contract developed with their on-site supervisor, their sponsoring organization and their faculty sponsor. Student performance will be assessed via various products (e.g. weekly journals, reflective paper, learning agreements), which will include samples of products or reports completed during the internship in both English and in the foreign language used at the internship site.

Elective related courses 6-8 hours

Two general elective courses must be satisfied in another foreign language of the student’s choice, written or signed.

Program Outcomes

Students will use ASL and written English to communicate information effectively in the field of international Studies with diverse audiences, for a variety of purposes, and in a variety of interdisciplinary settings. (GU SLO #1)

 

Students will demonstrate basic to intermediate proficiency in a written foreign language. (GU SLO #1)

 

Students will summarize, synthesize, and critically analyze ideas from the multiple disciplines involved in this major in order to draw well-supported conclusions related to the international Studies field and to their area of concentration. (GU SLO #2)

 

Students will describe similarities and differences among the political, historical, economic, cultural, and social situations of Deaf and hearing individuals in their international area of interest, as well as similarities and differences between their own Deaf community and one or more Deaf communities in the U.S. or abroad. (GU SLO #3)

 

Students will describe and apply basic research methodology from Government or Sociology in order to gather, evaluate, interpret, and report information in their area of concentration. (GU SLO #4)

 

Students will gain perspective on their role as citizens of the world by demonstrating (1) an awareness of the consequences that their own community's or their own country's actions have had or currently have on other communities across the world, and (2) as citizens of the world, they should be able to guide their actions in ways that are consistent with promoting the wellbeing of the larger global community. (GU SLO #5.)

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B.A. in Spanish

Pilar Pinar

202-250-2043

202-448-7067

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