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Areas of Study

Overview

Overview

Web: Interpretation and Translation

Dr. Paul Harrelson, Program Coordinator 

The concentration in Interpreting Research is designed to educate Deaf, hard of hearing, and hearing persons who have demonstrated competence in interpreting and who wish to further their education and knowledge with an advanced degree. This degree is designed to respond to the professional development needs of professional interpreters and interpreter educators. The program provides a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach to interpretation instruction. Education focuses on current academic knowledge in areas that include discourse analysis, comparative ASL and English for interpreters, analysis of interactions, and research. The first three areas of knowledge will also provide foundational knowledge and skills for conducting research. This degree includes an overview research course followed by two semesters of guided research courses in which students conduct original research with the goal of producing a solid study in publishable form. With this experience, graduates can continue their investigative interests through further education and study. This degree also prepares students to enter the Ph.D. in Interpretation program. The program follows a one year full-time format consisting of three semesters or a two-year part-time format consisting of four semesters. The program requires the completion of 30 credit hours of coursework.

Admissions Procedures

Applicants for the M.A. in Interpretation must complete the application procedures and meet the requirements for graduate study at Gallaudet University. Visit the Graduate Admissions website for more information and a checklist of application requirements.

DEADLINE DATE
First Date for Consideration of Application: January 15th
Last Date for Completed Application: March 15th or until all possible slots are filled. Students are accepted on a rolling basis.

Program Specific Requirements

  • Official transcript of all college work
  • TOEFL score (international applicants)
  • Three letters of reference – one letter should be from a consumer citing competence in interpreting
  • Resume/Curriculum Vitae
  • Valid certification from RID (CSC, NIC, CI/CT, CDI), NAD (III, IV, or V), AVLIC (COI), or documented equivalent for international applicants
  • ASLPI result of 4 or higher for ASL users
  • ASLPI result of 3 or higher for international students who are non-ASL users
  • Portfolio of unrehearsed interpreting samples in applicants’ working languages
  • One additional goals statement relating to ethics and professional practice

Graduation Requirements

Qualifying Paper

During the final year of coursework, all students must successfully complete a research-based paper. This paper will represent a substantial data-based research project related to interpretation. The research should address an important problem of manageable scope in the chosen field of study, and should make a significant contribution to the profession’s theory or practice. The literature review for this research will be submitted separately for evaluation as a qualifying paper.

Courses & Requirements

Summary of Requirements

Semester I (Fall)

This course focuses on the historical progression of the emerging professional and academic field of interpreting. Beginning with early perceptions of interpreters in both signed and spoken languages, the course includes topics such as the impact of translation research and practice on interpretation, issues of equivalency and accuracy, definitions, approaches to research, professional organizations, working conditions, international perspectives, and working with oppressed groups of people.

This course is an introduction to the linguistic structures of ASL and English for interpreters. Topics include phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and sociolinguistics, as well as depiction, bilingualism, language acquisition, and language variation. Students will identify and analyze linguistic features in their own and other peoples' linguistic use, and apply this information and skill to translating and interpreting work.

This course is a broad introduction to the study of language and communication by focusing on discourse analysis. During the course students will analyze language use in spoken English and American Sign Language (ASL) so that features of language use rise to the level of explicit awareness. Students collect, transcribe, and analyze various speech activities while reading and discussing theoretical notions underlying language use. Elements to be analyzed and discussed include but are not limited to: structure, cohesion, coherence, involvement and prosody.

This course focuses on the foundation skills required for effective translation and interpretation. The course includes critical analysis and application 1) for systematically analyzing interactions and texts in order to ascertain how meaning is co-constructed and where meaning lies, and 2) of understanding and developing the cognitive skills for translating and interpreting. Students will be introduced to and practice intralingual translation and interpretation, text analysis techniques through main point abstraction, summarization, paraphrasing and restructuring a message while retaining its meaning. Students will address theoretical constructs of translation and interpretation, as well as application of strategies and techniques required for effective interpretation. This class focuses on interactive settings with both face-to-face and monologic discourse for Deaf, Deaf/Blind, and non-deaf interpreters.

Semester II (Spring)

The course surveys both quantitative and qualitative research methods that have been successfully applied to the analysis of interpretation. Building from previous coursework, the course emphasizes the development of research design and implementation skills through a variety of activities including the critical analysis of research articles and the preparation of a guided research project examining some aspects of interpretation, conduct a literature review, gather data, perform analyses of the data, prepare a formal written report, and present findings in ASL. Either replication studies or original work may be accepted and students will be required to include abstracts, follow style guidelines, and to prepare their final paper as they would a submission to a refereed journal.

Semester III (Fall)

This course is the first course of the two courses, which will provide students with experience in gathering and analyzing interpretation data. In this course, students will select their methodology, conduct a literature review, gather data, and perform analyses of the data. Either replication studies or original work may be accepted and students will be required to include abstracts, follow style guidelines in preparation of their work for submitting it to a peer-reviewed journal for publication.

Candidacy paper

Semester IV (Spring)

This course is sequential to INT 777 Guided Research Project I. In this course, students will continue their work from INT 777 Guided Research Project I by completing their analyses of the data, preparing a final written report, and presenting their findings in ASL. Students will be required to include an abstract, follow style guidelines, and prepare their final paper for publication to submit to a peer-reviewed journal.

Semester I (Summer conducted ONLINE)

This course focuses on the historical progression of the emerging professional and academic field of interpreting. Beginning with early perceptions of interpreters in both signed and spoken languages, the course includes topics such as the impact of translation research and practice on interpretation, issues of equivalency and accuracy, definitions, approaches to research, professional organizations, working conditions, international perspectives, and working with oppressed groups of people.

This course is an introduction to the linguistic structures of ASL and English for interpreters. Topics include phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and sociolinguistics, as well as depiction, bilingualism, language acquisition, and language variation. Students will identify and analyze linguistic features in their own and other peoples' linguistic use, and apply this information and skill to translating and interpreting work.

The course surveys both quantitative and qualitative research methods that have been successfully applied to the analysis of interpretation. Building from previous coursework, the course emphasizes the development of research design and implementation skills through a variety of activities including the critical analysis of research articles and the preparation of a guided research project examining some aspects of interpretation, conduct a literature review, gather data, perform analyses of the data, prepare a formal written report, and present findings in ASL. Either replication studies or original work may be accepted and students will be required to include abstracts, follow style guidelines, and to prepare their final paper as they would a submission to a refereed journal.

Semester II (Fall)

This course is a broad introduction to the study of language and communication by focusing on discourse analysis. During the course students will analyze language use in spoken English and American Sign Language (ASL) so that features of language use rise to the level of explicit awareness. Students collect, transcribe, and analyze various speech activities while reading and discussing theoretical notions underlying language use. Elements to be analyzed and discussed include but are not limited to: structure, cohesion, coherence, involvement and prosody.

This course focuses on the foundation skills required for effective translation and interpretation. The course includes critical analysis and application 1) for systematically analyzing interactions and texts in order to ascertain how meaning is co-constructed and where meaning lies, and 2) of understanding and developing the cognitive skills for translating and interpreting. Students will be introduced to and practice intralingual translation and interpretation, text analysis techniques through main point abstraction, summarization, paraphrasing and restructuring a message while retaining its meaning. Students will address theoretical constructs of translation and interpretation, as well as application of strategies and techniques required for effective interpretation. This class focuses on interactive settings with both face-to-face and monologic discourse for Deaf, Deaf/Blind, and non-deaf interpreters.

This course is the first course of the two courses, which will provide students with experience in gathering and analyzing interpretation data. In this course, students will select their methodology, conduct a literature review, gather data, and perform analyses of the data. Either replication studies or original work may be accepted and students will be required to include abstracts, follow style guidelines in preparation of their work for submitting it to a peer-reviewed journal for publication.

Candidacy paper

Semester III (Spring)

This course is sequential to INT 777 Guided Research Project I. In this course, students will continue their work from INT 777 Guided Research Project I by completing their analyses of the data, preparing a final written report, and presenting their findings in ASL. Students will be required to include an abstract, follow style guidelines, and prepare their final paper for publication to submit to a peer-reviewed journal.

Program Outcomes

Graduates of the MA in Interpretation Program will be able to employ academic, professional, and world knowledge in the choices and decisions they make while interpreting.

 

Graduates of the MA in Interpretation Program will be able to support and justify the use of points of view representing multi-cultural approaches in the work of interpretation.

 

Graduates of the MA in Interpretation Program will be able to evaluate their own competencies for interpreting in relation to a variety of interpreting settings and participants in interpreted interactions.

 

Graduates of the MA in Interpretation Program will be able to effectively interpret face-to-face encounters in dialogic settings with a variety of participants

 

Graduates of the MA in Interpretation Program will be able to effectively interpret face-to-face encounters in monologic settings with a variety of participants.

 

Graduates of the MA in Interpretation Program will be able to evaluate professional standards, practices, and ethics, not limited to the tenets of the Code of Professional Conduct, for use in their interpreting practice.

 

Graduates of the MA in Interpretation Program will be able to appraise theoretical knowledge of interpretation studies in their interpreting practice, analyses, and research questions.

 

Graduates of the Interpretation Program will be able to effectively design and carry out all phases of small-scale research.

 

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M.A. in Interpretation: Interpreting Research

Paul Harrelson

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202-448-7067

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