Academics
Areas of Study

Overview

Bobbi Jo Kite Herbold, BA Program Coordinator
Fowler Hall, Room 301D

Courses & Requirements

Summary of Requirements

2022-2023
Core Curriculum 43
Pre-Major Courses 18
Major and Related Courses 33-36
Content Major Courses 42-64
TOTAL 136-161

Requirements for a Major in Education in Secondary Education

For continuation in a teacher education program, an education major must maintain a cumulative degree average of 2.75 or better, with a B or higher in education courses, a C+ or better in all pre-major, pre-professional courses, as well as a 2.75 content major GPA.

 

Recommended pre-major courses 3 hours*

EDU 665: *Required for Secondary English Majors

An in-depth study of children's literature primarily for early childhood and secondary education majors. Focuses on the evaluation, selection, and sharing of children's and young adult books in instructional settings. Participants will read, respond to, and evaluate picture books and chapter books of various genres. Emphasizes the identification and teaching of literary elements in context, strategies for sharing books with children, and the importance of using authentic children's and young's adult literature in schools.

Required pre-major course 18 hours

An overview and study of contemporary trends, problems, and issues in general education in terms of educational philosophies, types of educational programs, the relation of education to the individual and society, and curriculum and instruction. Some consideration of the relevance of regular education to special education and education of deaf and hard of hearing students. Discussion of organizations and agencies related to education.

The course addresses the application of psychological principles to the educational setting. Topics include learning theory, cognition and memory, individualized instruction, human development, intelligence, creativity, exceptionality, motivation, discipline, and measurement and evaluation.

An introduction to the major features of languages and to the structure, use, and variation in the sign languages and sign systems commonly used in the United States. The course will cover four major topics: (1) Language: The nature and definition of languages, the uniqueness of language, and contrasts between language and other forms of communication; (2) Language and Culture: The role of language in human society, with special focus on language acquisition, language identity, and bilingualism; (3) American Sign Language Structure: A survey of the major features of the linguistic structure of ASL. Topics are: Phonology: the structure of the physical signals; Morphology: the basic structure and composition of meaningful units of ASL; Syntax: word order and nonmanual syntactic signals in ASL sentences; (4) Language Variation: Language variation and language contact in the deaf community, including discussions of contact varieties of signing and systems for representing English.

An introduction to the scientific study of human behavior, providing an overview of the major issues, methods, and contributions of psychology. Content areas include development, language, learning, cognition, physiological psychology intelligence, and abnormal and social psychology.

This course examines physical, emotional, social, cognitive, and language development from conception to the end of childhood. We will analyze the complexity of factors that contribute to developmental outcomes, including transactions between genetic and environmental factors. Developmental theory and research evidence will be used to address the well-being of children in the US and around the globe, with specific attention to inequities related to race, class, language, and culture.

A study of developmental processes in adolescence. Included is the study of puberty and the intellectual, social, moral, emotional, religious, sexual, personality, and family transitions occurring during this period. Emphasis is given to the influence of the above changes on personal identity and current problems of the adolescent in American society. Also included is a discussion of levels of aspiration and vocational choice.

Required major courses 33 hours

Pre-professional Component

This course is designed to provide students with a foundational understanding of the theories, research and literature in the area of language and literacy acquisition and learning. Students will examine their own beliefs and processes related to language and literacy acquisition and learning. This course will prepare students for subsequent courses that address literacy teaching and learning in the classroom and the home courses.

Professional Component:

In this course, the Undergraduate Education program students spend at least 36 hours serving and aiding teachers in a public school program. This course will address integrating content (Language Arts and Social Studies) and require students to apply what is learned in the previous coursework to practicum situations in school sites. Regular group seminars are held to discuss, analyze, and reflect on educational topics related to teaching. This course prepares students for a subsequent student teaching experience.

This course will familiarize students with the nature and importance of curriculum in education from K-12. The course also provides an initial experience in integrated curriculum planning that incorporates the use of current technologies. Current theories of assessment, curriculum, instruction and learning across diverse educational settings are applied in classroom laboratory settings. Content assessments and evaluation in the candidate area(s) of study are emphasized. Field experience in a school setting is a required part of this course.

In this course, candidates examine the purposeful social and cognitive processes of adolescent literacy, address instructional issues related to teaching and learning reading and writing in the middle and secondary grades (6-12), practice effective ways to deliver literacy skills for adolescents across a range of domains, with consideration given to motivation, comprehension, critical thinking, and assessment. This course provides the basis in adolescent literacy teaching and learning for teacher candidates who are about to embark upon the student teaching practicum experience in middle and secondary school settings, and requires related field-work.

This course is the final professional experience in the secondary programs and is a required field experience in a school classroom for a period of at least ten weeks under the supervision of the classroom teacher (cooperating teacher) and a University Supervisor. During the course, the student will take responsibility for planning, teaching, and evaluating all aspects of the classroom program. A required seminar is held weekly on campus for purposes of common problems and/or concerns, and exchange of useful teaching experiences.

This course is designed to familiarize students with the identification of exceptional children in terms of developmental needs, interpretation of assessment data, development and evaluation of appropriate intervention strategies for the regular classroom teacher, and legislation in special education. This course will prepare teacher candidates to work with children and youth with a broad range of disabilities and educational needs. Topics will include understanding disability; understanding principles of legislation and curriculum and instruction; establishing positive learning environments; and working collaboratively.

The student teaching seminar is a capstone course in which student teachers in the Undergraduate Education Program meet regularly as a group to discuss, analyze, reflect upon and resolve classroom issues that occur during their full-time internship experiences with hearing students. This course is designed to be taken in tandem with Student Teaching. Students will be participating in student teaching at various clinical sites every weekday for 10 weeks. Educational topics related to assessment, classroom management, certification, portfolio development, and related areas are covered in depth.

Choose one course in consultation with the department:

In this course, teacher candidates explore and apply research-supported trends and curriculum in secondary English language arts instruction with diverse, English Language Learners (ELL), and special needs middle and high school adolescents. Topics covered in the course include professional standards for learning and teaching the pedagogy of secondary English language arts instruction in a technologically-advanced world, formal and informal assessment and evaluation, personal literacy development, and reflective professional engagement. Candidates read and respond to young adult literature across a range of genres, and create a macro-unit that includes reading and writing micro-lessons. The course should be taken concurrently with fieldwork dedicated to middle or secondary education (Grades 6-12).

This course is a literacy intensive course that concentrates on curriculum trends, teaching techniques, and appropriate media for teaching social studies in middle and secondary schools today. The course stresses the topics include: the social science disciplines in relation to social studies, simulation activities, instructional planning, evaluation, multi-cultural education, inquiry skills, and how to deal with controversial social issues in the classrooms.

In this course, teacher candidates will learn about the current curriculum, contents, materials, and methodologies utilized by educators in the secondary school science class. The teacher candidates will explore methodological principles and apply them by developing lesson plans, science portfolio, activities, and projects. Observation, laboratory activities and participation in a field experience are included in this course. The teacher candidates will learn science by doing science using (FOSS) Full Option Science System.

Students will learn about the current curriculum, content, materials, and methodologies utilized by educators in the secondary school mathematics curriculum. Students will explore methodological principles and apply them by developing lesson plans, a mathematics portfolio, activities, and projects. Observations, hand-on activities and participation in a field experience are included in the course. Students will learn mathematics by doing mathematics using National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Principles and Standards for School Mathematics.

Choose a content major program from the following:

  • Biology 49 hours and Chemistry 61 hours (for a complete list of courses required for licensure in Biology, Chemistry or General Science, please contact the Undergraduate Program Director) 
  • English 39 hours – English majors must take ENG 375 and 460
  • Mathematics 43 hours – Mathematics majors must take MAT 410
  • Social Studies 39 hours [30 hours in history which includes HIS 322 and 323, GOV 110 and 301, and SOC 101, and ECO 205]

Students will complete field experiences in conjunction with the courses below. These field experience hours do not count in the summary of requirements for the specialization. Students will be required to pay a fee for suitability background checks prior to their initial field experiences in the program. The courses with field experiences include:

Required

EDU 311 and EDU 641: 30 clock hours

EDU 600: 40 clock hours

This course is designed to provide students with a foundational understanding of the theories, research and literature in the area of language and literacy acquisition and learning. Students will examine their own beliefs and processes related to language and literacy acquisition and learning. This course will prepare students for subsequent courses that address literacy teaching and learning in the classroom and the home courses.

This course will familiarize students with the nature and importance of curriculum in education from K-12. The course also provides an initial experience in integrated curriculum planning that incorporates the use of current technologies. Current theories of assessment, curriculum, instruction and learning across diverse educational settings are applied in classroom laboratory settings. Content assessments and evaluation in the candidate area(s) of study are emphasized. Field experience in a school setting is a required part of this course.

In this course, candidates examine the purposeful social and cognitive processes of adolescent literacy, address instructional issues related to teaching and learning reading and writing in the middle and secondary grades (6-12), practice effective ways to deliver literacy skills for adolescents across a range of domains, with consideration given to motivation, comprehension, critical thinking, and assessment. This course provides the basis in adolescent literacy teaching and learning for teacher candidates who are about to embark upon the student teaching practicum experience in middle and secondary school settings, and requires related field-work.

Program Outcomes

Based on the Council of Exceptional Children (CEC) Standards and Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) Principles

 

Standard 1: Learner Development:The teacher candidate understands how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and values the perspectives of the child, their family, and the community.

 

Standard 2: Learning Differences: The teacher candidate uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures, languages, and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that are developmentally appropriate and provide challenging learning experiences for each and every learner to achieve their highest potential.

 

Standard 3: Learning Environments: The teacher candidate works independently and with others to create environments that support individual and group learning, and that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement, and self-motivation.

 

Standard 4: Content Knowledge:The teacher candidate understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the disciplines he or she teaches and creates learning experiences that make these aspects of the discipline accessible and meaningful for each and every learner.

 

Standard 5: Application of Content: The teacher candidate understands how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, evaluation, and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues.

 

Standard 6: Assessment: The teacher understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, monitor learner progress, and guide the teacher's and learner's decision-making.

 

Standard 7: Planning for Instruction:The teacher candidate plans instruction that supports each and every student in meeting rigorous learning goals by drawing upon knowledge of content areas curriculum, cross-disciplinary skills, and pedagogy as well as knowledge of learners and the community context.

 

Standard 8: Instructional Strategies: The teacher candidate uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop a deep understanding of content areas and their connections, and the critical thinking and problem-solving skills needed to apply knowledge in meaningful ways.

 

Standard 9: Reflection, Professional Learning, and Ethical Practice: The teacher candidate engages in ongoing reflection and professional learning and uses evidence to evaluate practice, particularly the effects of the teacher candidate's choices and actions on others (learners, families, other professionals, and the community, and adapts practice to meet the needs of the learner.

 

Standard 10: Leadership, Advocacy, and Collaboration:The teacher candidate seeks appropriate advocacy and leadership roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student learning to collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner growth.

 

Standard 11: Technology:The teacher candidate uses knowledge of effective multimedia communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and accessibility to support interaction in the classroom.

 

Standard 12: Literacy and Numeracy: The teacher candidate applies a variety of instructional strategies to develop and enhance the literacy and numeracy skills of each and every learner including the use of multiple representations and explanations to present ideas and concepts.

 

Accreditation

Gallaudet University is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE) and recognized by the U.S. Department of Education as a Title IV approved institution. The Gallaudet University B.A. Education: Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, or Secondary Education program is accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Preparation (CAEP) organization. The program is also approved by the District of Columbia State Education Agency (SEA) and licensed by the National Association of State Directors of Teacher Education and Certification (NASDTEC). In compliance with the U.S. Department of Education and the District of Columbia Higher Education Licensure Commission (HELC) requirements for participation in the National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement (NC-SARA), Gallaudet University provides information pertaining to this program and teacher educator licensure within each of the U.S. states and territories. This program is designed to meet the educational requirements for teacher educator licensure in the District of Columbia. If your intent is to secure licensure outside of Washington, D.C., then BEFORE beginning Gallaudet University's program, use the drop-down list below and select the state or territory in which licensure is intended. This will help you determine whether Gallaudet has obtained confirmation from the state or territory to formally identify whether the Gallaudet B.A. Education: Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, or Secondary Education program meets, does not meet or cannot be confirmed as meeting the educational requirements for licensure.

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Undergraduate Admissions

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B.A. or B.S. in Education with a Specialization in Secondary Education: Science, English, Mathematics or Social Studies

Bobbie Kite

202-250-2043

202-448-7067

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