Academics
Areas of Study

Overview

Overview

Dr. Kara Hawthorne, Program Director

Sorenson Language and Communication Center, Room 3114

 

The Ph.D. program in Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences prepares students with a masters or clinical doctorate in a related field (e.g., Au.D., M.S. in SLP) for faculty and research positions in universities and other research facilities. The Ph.D. program consists of coursework in research methods and statistics, professional issues (teaching, grant-writing), and advanced topics in hearing, speech, and language sciences. Students are also expected to be continuously enrolled in ASL classes until they have successfully completed (or tested out of) PST 303.

 

Additional requirements include a qualifying examination, a supervised practicum in higher education teaching, a research internship leading to a pre-dissertation project, a candidacy examination, and a dissertation that addresses a critical question in hearing, speech, and language sciences. Students in the HSLS Ph.D. program have research opportunities within the department, as well as with other Gallaudet departments and affiliated programs in other universities and research sites.

If you have questions, contact us at phd.hsls@gallaudet.edu.

Admissions Procedures and Eligibility

Applicants for the Ph.D. in Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences must meet the requirements for graduate study at Gallaudet University and have a masters or clinical doctorate in a related field. Individuals from traditionally under-represented groups (deaf or hard of hearing and individuals from underrepresented racial-ethnic groups) are especially encouraged to apply.

Prospective students are encouraged to explore the research interests of faculty in our department. Visit the Graduate Admissions website for more information and to apply.

Deadline to apply for this program:

Preferred deadline for international applicants:  January 15
Preferred deadline for domestic applicants: February 15

Admission Requirements

•Completed application (including application fee)

•CV

•Undergraduate and graduate transcripts, reflecting a GPA of 3.2 or higher and a master’s or clinical doctorate in audiology, speech-language pathology, or a related field

•Three letters of recommendation

•Goals statement

•Writing sample

•Interview

Courses & Requirements

Summary of Requirements

Year I – Fall (12 Credits)

Note: Excluding ASL from total credits

This introductory course sequence develops the primary statistical concepts and techniques needed to conduct research. This course presumes no previous statistical background other than college-level algebra or its equivalent. The course goal is to develop many of the basic conceptual theories underlying statistical applications, while also developing a critical perspective toward statistics. Students will develop skills in descriptive statistical analysis, simple correlation procedures, and hypothesis testing. Computer-assisted analysis will complement course work.

Discussion of the theory and applications of inferential statistics, including sampling, estimation, confidence intervals, inferences, effect sizes and hypothesis testing as well as descriptive statistics, validity and reliability. Specific statistical techniques such as t tests, Chi Square, one way and factorial analyses of variance, correlations, simple and multiple regression as well as an introduction to trend analysis will be presented. Lab experiences in using SPSS or similar computer programs for analyzing data will be provided. Evaluations of statistical methods used in published research will be discussed.

The series of Advanced Topic classes are designed to introduce foundational issues in Hearing, Speech and Language Sciences. It is designed to explore theories, research methodologies and translation to clinical practice in each of the three areas. Students can expect to build a foundation of knowledge that can inform research in hearing, speech, and language sciences. The Speech Science Course include topics in speech acoustics, speech production and speech perception. In speech acoustics, students will study the physics of sound waves and how it is created and transmitted. In speech production, methods and tools for addressing typical and atypical generation of speech are examined. In Speech Perception, the many factors in hearing, seeing and feeling speech is studied. Focus will be given to different theoretical account and models of speech acoustics, production and perception.

The series of Advanced Topic classes are designed to introduce foundational issues in Hearing, Speech and Language Sciences. It is designed to explore theories, research methodologies and translation to clinical practice in each of the three areas. Students can expect to build a foundation of knowledge that can inform research in hearing, speech, and language sciences. The Language Science Course will include the study of theoretical constructs (principles, parameters and non-linear phonology), methods (psycholinguistics, grammaticality judgment, reaction time) and terminology (cohesion, agreement, features) of the Language Sciences (linguistics, neurolinguistics and psycholinguistics).

Year I – Spring (13 Credits)

Note: Excluding ASL from total credits

The series of Advanced Topic classes are designed to introduce foundational issues in Hearing, Speech and Language Sciences. It is designed to explore theories, research methodologies and translation to clinical practice in each of the three areas. Students can expect to build a foundation of knowledge that can inform research in hearing, speech, and language sciences. The Hearing Science Course will focus on the anatomy, physiology and psychophysical (psycho-acoustics) bases of sound detection, discrimination and perception. The processing and perception of sounds (speech and non-speech) by a typical or atypical auditory system will be explored along with procedures, instrumentation and techniques employed in hearing science research.

In HSL 887 Lab Rotation it is expected that students rotate through the various laboratories in the HSLS department and research laboratories within the university under the guidance of their academic advisor. Students are expected to: (1) observe activities within the lab, (2) attend lab meetings, and /or (3) participate in ongoing research activities. Students will become familiar with the questions framing the laboratory¿s research, how each question is addressed through various methodologies, and gain hands-on experience with the steps of the scientific method. Students are expected to submit reflection papers highlighting their experience in each laboratory. Students will describe the observed theory or hypothesis, research design, analysis and clinical interpretation in hearing, speech and language sciences and relate it to their own experiences and readings.

The main purpose of the Advanced Research Design I course is to facilitate student¿s integration of theory, research design, and measurement issues with knowledge of statistical procedures needed to plan, accomplish, and evaluate qualitative and quantitative research projects in speech, language and hearing sciences. Students will develop their ability to locate, review, and critically evaluate research studies. The course will cover the proper format for research proposals and reports, measurement issues, and sampling. In addition, the student is introduced to quantitative and qualitative approaches to research. The student will develop critical analysis abilities using the criteria of validity and reliability as explicated in experimental design principles. Specifically, the course will focus on (1) Identifying and formulating research questions, (2) Completing a literature search and literature review, (3) non-experiment (qualitative) research design (case studies, survey research), (3) experimental research and levels of evidence, (4) research participants and sampling, (5) data analysis: describing different types of data, (6) data analysis: inferential statistics, (7) research outcomes.

Qualifying Examination at end of semester

Year II – Fall (11-14 Credits)

Note: Excluding ASL from total credits

This course is intended to develop professional competencies in three areas: (a) knowledge and use of the following approaches to research: experimental, quasiexperimental, causal-comparative, qualitative, and correlational research, and (b) develop knowledge of experimental research design options, (c) development of formal research proposals. This course will address major concepts, issues, and techniques of quantitative research methods.

In this course students are introduced to various pieces of software, hardware, and laboratory techniques common to research in speech, language, and hearing sciences. Through various teaching methodologies students learn to use the basic tools that are important for research in hearing, speech and language sciences with a focus on gaining practical, hands-on experience. The goal of this course is to prepare students to critically make decisions regarding laboratory instrumentation for experiments.

It is expected that every student complete at least one year of supervised research under the mentorship of an established researcher/faculty member. Students may complete this requirement during their full-time residency year (during the first three years of matriculation) in which the student is required to spend at least 15 hours per week in supervised research activity. This is to provide students with an opportunity to work with and learn from established researchers in transitioning previously acquired academic knowledge and skills to applied knowledge and skills. The main goal is to provide students with a sound overview of scientific research to prepare them to begin doctoral research. Students' ability to apply the scientific method to speech, language, and hearing research will be advanced. Students will refine their ability to evaluate the research literature, formulate a research question, and develop a research design. Ideally, research practicum should culminate in one or more of the following: (1) submission of an article for publication, 2) submission for presentation at a referred conference, (3) pre-dissertation project or pilot data for their dissertation.

Year II – Spring (11-15 Credits)

The purpose of the Ph.D. Candidacy Exam is to evaluate the student's success in attaining expertise in a related set of scholarly areas sufficient for conducting original, advanced research, and successful graduate teaching in those areas. In consultation with the student's main advisor, the student will identify several scholarly areas in which the student wishes to attain expertise. Once competency areas have been defined, the next step is to identify prospective faculty mentors/examiners for each area (3-4 including the main advisor). The student will register for 1 credit under each committee member to prepare for the candidacy examination. It is the responsibility of the student, with the guidance of the mentor for each scholarly area to:(1) develop a reading list/bibliography, (2) write a comprehensive literature review essay, and (3) prepare for the oral exam. The course is an individual instruction course, graded P or F.
The purpose of the Ph.D. Candidacy Exam is to evaluate the student's success in attaining expertise in a related set of scholarly areas sufficient for conducting original, advanced research, and successful graduate teaching in those areas. In consultation with the student's main advisor, the student will identify several scholarly areas in which the student wishes to attain expertise. Once competency areas have been defined, the next step is to identify prospective faculty mentors/examiners for each area (3-4 including the main advisor). The student will register for 1 credit under each committee member to prepare for the candidacy examination. It is the responsibility of the student, with the guidance of the mentor for each scholarly area to:(1) develop a reading list/bibliography, (2) write a comprehensive literature review essay, and (3) prepare for the oral exam. The course is an individual instruction course, graded P or F.
The purpose of the Ph.D. Candidacy Exam is to evaluate the student's success in attaining expertise in a related set of scholarly areas sufficient for conducting original, advanced research, and successful graduate teaching in those areas. In consultation with the student's main advisor, the student will identify several scholarly areas in which the student wishes to attain expertise. Once competency areas have been defined, the next step is to identify prospective faculty mentors/examiners for each area (3-4 including the main advisor). The student will register for 1 credit under each committee member to prepare for the candidacy examination. It is the responsibility of the student, with the guidance of the mentor for each scholarly area to:(1) develop a reading list/bibliography, (2) write a comprehensive literature review essay, and (3) prepare for the oral exam. The course is an individual instruction course, graded P or F.

In the Ph.D. Professional and Ethical Issues Seminar course addresses topics of interest to doctoral students who plan to seek faculty positions in academic settings. Topics addressed include mentor-mentee relationships, job hunting and interviewing, academic career development, curriculum vitae, electronic portfolios, professional organizations serving college and university professors, tenure and promotion decisions, professional ethics, professional liability, mission statements and strategic objectives in academic settings, the roles of administers and faculty in curriculum development, faculty evaluation, and shared governance. This course will include discussion and readings of topics concerning scientific, research and medical ethics and practical issues in the scientific advancement of speech, language and hearing sciences. Discussions will also center on cultural considerations on scientific advancements in the field.

It is expected that every student complete at least one year of supervised research under the mentorship of an established researcher/faculty member. Students may complete this requirement during their full-time residency year (during the first three years of matriculation) in which the student is required to spend at least 15 hours per week in supervised research activity. This is to provide students with an opportunity to work with and learn from established researchers in transitioning previously acquired academic knowledge and skills to applied knowledge and skills. The main goal is to provide students with a sound overview of scientific research to prepare them to begin doctoral research. Students' ability to apply the scientific method to speech, language, and hearing research will be advanced. Students will refine their ability to evaluate the research literature, formulate a research question, and develop a research design. Ideally, research practicum should culminate in one or more of the following: (1) submission of an article for publication, 2) submission for presentation at a referred conference, (3) pre-dissertation project or pilot data for their dissertation.

Year III – Fall (4 Credits)

In HSL 892 Dissertation Seminar students preparing their dissertation proposal enroll in this course. Students will develop a research proposal based upon a topic of the student's choice. Students will describe a problem area, develop a rationale for a study through the literature review, develop and explore a research hypothesis, come up with appropriate research methodology and data analysis. Students will share their progress on the development of their dissertation proposal and are required to make three presentations at different stages of their proposals (research question and rationale, literature review, research design and pilot data). The course can be repeated until the research proposal is approved by the student's dissertation committee.

Practicum students in HSL 896 assume a major role in teaching a graduate course in the Department of Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences. The goal of this practicum is to develop the PhD student's ability to plan, teach, and evaluate the effectiveness of a graduate level course in a content area in which the student has expertise. Students earn 2-3 credits for the practicum, depending on the level of involvement in designing and/or teaching the course.

Year III - Spring and beyond

1 credit per semester until graduation

The dissertation is the culminating activity of the Ph.D. Program in Communication Sciences and Disorders. Students may register for 1-10 credits; In no instance will more than 10 credits be accrued. A grade of NG is recorded for dissertation credits until the student has satisfactorily defended the dissertation.

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Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences Programs conduct extensive research on communication access for deaf and hard of hearing people.

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Ph.D. in Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences

Kara Hawthorne

SLCC 3110

(202) 568-8766

(202) 651-5327

(202) 448-7144

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