Academics
Areas of Study

Overview

Overview

Upon completion of General Studies, pre-major and major core course requirements, students may choose one of the two application domain concentration areas in Network/Database/Web or Medical Informatics, or select a minor from other undergraduate programs at Gallaudet.

IT Major Internship Requirement

One summer or semester internship is required. Students can start the internship program in their sophomore year. Our in-house internship coordinator and faculty advisor will work closely with each student on internship preparation, placement, and follow-up.

Laptop and ACM Student Membership Requirements

IT majors and minors are required to have their own laptops. Check the IT Program website for minimum system configurations for laptops (PC and Apple Mac). They are also required to join Association of Computing Machinery (www.acm.org), the world’s largest professional, educational, and scientific computing society. An annual student membership fee is $19 with many benefits, such as free online books and courses, career advises, job fairs, student and computing professional networks, and conferences.

Courses & Requirements

Summary of Requirements

2022-2023
Core Curriculum 43
Pre-Major Courses 7
Required Related Courses 6
Major Core Courses 45
Concentration Elective Courses or Minor Courses 15-21
Free Elective Courses 4
TOTAL 120-122

Information Technology Pre-Major Courses (7 credits):

MAT 130: Three of the four hours count toward the general studies requirement, replacing GSR104; the remaining hour is counted as part of the pre-major course requirements.

This is the first IT course for students who plan to major or minor in IT. The course and the lab provide the conceptual foundations in understanding technologies. Topics include: computer platforms of hardware and software; the Internet and the web, networking, enterprise computing, e-commerce, database management, information systems development, security, and computer industry and careers. It emphasizes uses and applications as well as emerging trends and ethical issues in the information technology field.

This course introduces fundamental concepts of computer programming. Students learn program logic, flow charting, and problem solving through analysis, development, basic debugging and testing procedures. Topics include variables, expressions, data types, functions, decisions, loops, and arrays. Students will use the knowledge and skills gained throughout this course to develop a variety of simple programs.

This course emphasizes the meaning and application of the concepts of functions. It covers polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions and their graphs, trigonometric identities. Passing both MAT 125 and 126 is equivalent to passing MAT 130.

Required Related Courses (6 credits):

Number systems, set theory, functions, combinatorics, algorithms and complexity, and graph theory. Applications to computer science are emphasized.

This is an introductory course in probability and statistics for science and information technology students. It covers basic concepts of probability and statistics, frequency distributions, graphical methods, measures of central tendency and variability, counting principles, Bayes' theorem, discrete and normal probability distributions, linear regression models, correlation, central limit theorem, sampling variability, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. Applications to different fields are included throughout.

Major Core Courses (45 credits):

This course covers essential concepts in computer hardware with a focus on Personal Computers (PC). Students will learn the core components including the processor, motherboard, memory, video and sound adapters, storage devices, and power supplies. Windows operating systems will be used to manage the hardware. Through a hands-on approach, students will develop skills to install, configure, troubleshoot, and repair computer hardware equipment.

This course covers fundamental concepts of computer operating systems. It provides the theory and technical information on popular operating systems, such as Windows, Mac OS, and UNIX/Linux platforms. Topics include operating system theory, installation, upgrading, configuring (operating system and hardware), file systems, security, hardware options, and storage, as well as resource sharing, network connectivity, maintenance, and troubleshooting. Through a hands-on approach, students will develop skills to install, configure, and troubleshoot operating systems.

In this course, students learn problem-solving and programming coding skills to develop software applications/tools. Students are introduced to a high-level programming language. Topics include data types, selections, loops, methods, arrays, objects and classes, strings and text I/O, arithmetic and logic operations, control structures and error handling. Students will learn techniques to design, code, debug, and document programs through hands-on programming projects.

This course continues the development of the principles of a high-level programming language introduced in the Programming Language I course. Topics include: data abstraction, encapsulation, overloaded and overridden methods, inheritance, polymorphism, even-driven programming, and exception handling.

This course provides a comprehensive coverage of networking hardware, operating systems, topologies, protocols, design, implementation, security, and troubleshooting; along with research and communication skills necessary to succeed in the dynamic field of computer networking. Through hands-on approach, students will learn fundamental and vendor-independent networking concepts and develop the skills to build a network from scratch and to maintain, upgrade, and troubleshoot an existing network.

This course introduces internet technology and the principles and techniques necessary for successful web development. Topics such as HTML5, Cascading Style Sheets, JavaScript, DOM, jQuery, multimedia, web page design and web site publishing are presented. Students will learn to develop attractive and interactive web pages and applications.

This course provides the foundation for understanding the key issues associated with protecting information assets, determining the levels of protection and response to security incidents, and designing a consistent, reasonable information security system, with appropriate intrusion detection and reporting features. Students will be exposed to a spectrum of security activities, methods, methodologies, and procedures. Coverage will include inspection and protection of information assets, detection of and reaction to threats to information assets, and examination of pre-and post-incident procedures, technical and managerial responses, and an overview of the information security planning and staffing functions.

This course provides students with the essential conceptual knowledge and hands-on experience in designing and creating applications for mobile devices. It covers the best practices for solving the design and implementation issues of mobile applications, and the development of applications for different mobile platforms. Students will work on small scale programming projects.

This course teaches logical and physical characteristics of data and their organization and retrieval in information processing. Topics include database theory and architecture, data modeling, normalization. Students will learn to use PC-based database management system (DBMS) software and design and implement database applications.

This course builds on the knowledge and skills acquired from database fundamentals. It covers technologies such as SQL and PHP and advanced topics in database design and implementation. Students will learn a variety of current Web technologies and programming languages used to build interface between a relational database and a Web server.

A study of the methods used in analyzing needs for information and in specifying requirements for an application system. Implementation of the operational system, integration of computer technology, and aspects of organizational behavior in the design support system are examined. Topics include the concept of the system life cycle, the iterative nature of the processes of analysis and design, and the methodology for developing a logical specification and physical design for an operational system.

This course examines the practical and theoretical issues of how people interact with computers. Students are introduced to an overview of user-centered design principles and tools that help them developing effective and efficient user interfaces in subsequent courses and in their careers. Topics include: HCI history, accessibility, cognitive psychology, and styles assessment, user analysis, task analysis, interaction design, prototyping and human-centered evaluation.

This course explores how IT has changed the nature of society and contributed to evolution of global economy. It examines changing nature of work, education, and communication, and ethical issues such as intellectual property rights, legal issues in computing, computer-related crimes, privacy concerns, and public policy issues.

As part two of a two-semester sequence courses intended for senior IT majors to integrate knowledge and skills acquired in the IT core curriculum and concentration courses, students will engage in the development and implementation of an information systems project intended for actual use upon completion. This course emphasizes turning the alpha designs into prototypes in the development phase, and conducting usability tests and producing user support documentation in the implementation phase. All activities are coordinated in a team-based environment.

This course is for STM majors who are in their last year of the program. Students will produce two major products: (1) a grant proposal to a national or private agency and (2)interdisciplinary group project. In addition, students will discuss future career plans,examine contributions of different deaf scientists to science, and engage in discussions on science ethics and science literacy.

Required Concentration Elective Courses (15 credits):

Students who select Network/Database/Web or Medical Informatics as a concentration area must take 15 credit hours of the courses listed under Network/Database/Web Concentration Electives or 15 credit hours of the courses listed under Medical Informatics Concentration Electives. If approved by their major advisor, students may fulfill the concentration requirement by completing a minor from another undergraduate program at Gallaudet.

Network/Database/Web Concentration Electives (15 credits):

Special Topics in the discipline, designed primarily for sophomores. Students may enroll in 295 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

This course emphasizes on building dynamic Internet and web-based applications that interact with other applications and databases. Students will learn a variety of scripting languages, such as JavaScript and JQuery for client side scripting and PHP for server-side scripting, and Web database connectivity and XML technologies. Students will carry out teamwork to design, implement, and evaluate various Web projects.

This course is cross-listed and is otherwise known as COM 390. The ability to have access to communications is an important foundation for empowerment of people who are deaf and hard of hearing. This course explores how communication accessibility is achieved through study of current and emerging technology, trends in industry, public policies, and the government agencies that enforce these policies. Access to telecommunications (including Internet and wireless communications, relay services, etc.), information, video media, emergency services, public accommodations, employment, education, and other contexts are included.

This course teaches students how to create technical documents that are generally expected from an IT professional. Students will learn to write clearly and succinctly technical memos, user documentation and technical requirements for an IT system, proposals, reports, and formal papers.

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for juniors. Students may enroll in 395 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

This course will cover techniques essential to a Database Administrator. Topics include: creating the initial database; configuring storage space, tables and users; monitoring performance; securing a database system; and performing backup and recovery.

This course covers topics such as managing server hardware devices; creating and managing users and groups; managing disk, data storage, and file access; implementing and managing printing; implementing and using Group Policies; administering a server; monitoring server performance; managing and implementing backups and disaster recovery; administering Web resources and security basics for a server. Students will learn how to install, configure, administer, and troubleshoot in a Windows server environment.

This course is designed to provide the students with the prerequisite skills and knowledge to participate in the ever-growing electronic business sector. Specific topic areas include key E-commerce concepts, emerging technologies related to E-commerce, business to business, business to consumers, consumers to consumers and global business transactions.

This course covers information security issues in corporate environments. The focus is on the threat environment, security policy and planning, cryptography, secure networks, access control, firewalls, host hardening, application security, data protection, incident response, networking and review of TCP/IP. Hands-on lab activities will be used to reinforce concepts and to provide experience in handling suspected security breaches.

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for seniors who are majors or minors. Students may enroll in 495 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

Cybersecurity Concentration Electives (15 credits):

Special Topics in the discipline, designed primarily for sophomores. Students may enroll in 295 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

This is an introductory course in cryptography for computer security. It covers classical cryptosystems, block ciphers and the advanced encryption standard, public-key cryptography, RSA cryptosystem, key establishment protocols, identification and entity authentication, and key management technique.

The course analyzes the protocols involved in cybersecurity investigations, and provides a thorough grounding in the principles required to assume the role of a cybersecurity investigator and to be familiar with the evidentiary concepts surrounding the legal proceedings of digital evidence. The course will focus on both hands-on digital forensic experience using open-source digital forensics tools and case law that covers electronic discovery, privacy, and cybersecurity considerations. In this course, the student not only gains experience using digital forensics tools but also will learn about legal precedents that discusses the ''why'' behind the ''how''.

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for juniors. Students may enroll in 395 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

This course covers information security issues in corporate environments. The focus is on the threat environment, security policy and planning, cryptography, secure networks, access control, firewalls, host hardening, application security, data protection, incident response, networking and review of TCP/IP. Hands-on lab activities will be used to reinforce concepts and to provide experience in handling suspected security breaches.

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for seniors who are majors or minors. Students may enroll in 495 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

Medical Informatics Concentration Electives (15 credits):

This course covers the building blocks of basic medical terminology. The relationship of word parts to their anatomical counterparts will be studied. Rules for combining word parts into complete medical terms will be emphasized. The correct contextual use of terms will be emphasized throughout the course. Such understanding will facilitate learning of scientific and medical principles encountered during more advanced career preparation.

This course covers the fundamentals of biomolecules, cell physiology, respiration and photosynthesis, and genetics. In laboratory, students will develop and test hypotheses by designing their own experiments to better understand different biological concepts. Students will also learn how to use a microscope and pipettors and will write laboratory reports in the same format as professional journal articles. This is one of two courses of introductory biology for science majors. BIO107 and BIO108 can be taken in either order. BIO 107 and BIO 108 are designed for students who want to major in biology or another science, or who plan to attend dental, veterinary, or medical school after graduation. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

This course covers the fundamentals of evolution, comparative biodiversity, human and animal anatomy and physiology, and ecology and environmental science. In laboratory, students will develop and test hypotheses by designing their own experiments to better understand different biological concepts. Students will also learn how to use computer simulation models to predict outcomes, grow and enumerate bacteria and plants, and write laboratory reports in the same format as professional journal articles. This is one of two courses of introductory biology for science majors. BIO107 and BIO108 can be taken in either order. BIO 107 and BIO 108 are designed for students who want to major in biology or another science, or who plan to attend dental, veterinary, or medical school after graduation. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

The first part of a two-semester course sequence, this course will study the various systems of the body from a combined anatomical and physiological standpoint, with laboratory experiments which illustrate their structure and function. Students will develop their critical thinking skills by analyzing hypothetical problems relating to anatomy and physiology; many of these problems will have medical applications. The first semester will focus on the following organ systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and special sensory. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

The second part of a two-semester course sequence, this course will cover the remaining physiological systems of the body Students will develop their critical thinking skills by analyzing hypothetical problems relating to anatomy and physiology; many of these problems will have medical applications. This semester will focus on the following organ systems: endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and male and female reproductive systems. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

Designed for science majors, this is the first of a two-semester sequence and is designed to help students become familiar with the properties and reactions of matter. This course will also address modern applications of these concepts. Specific topics for this course include: observation of properties and changes, scientific method, unit conversions and measurements, chemical formulas, balancing equations, predicting products and yields, reactions and reaction types, the Ideal Gas Law, thermodynamics, molecular and atomic structure of matter, and orbital hybridization.

Designed for science majors, this course is the second of a two-semester sequence and is designed to help students become familiar with the properties and reactions of matter. This course will also address modern applications of these concepts. Specific topics for this course include: chemical bonding concepts, solution chemistry, colligative properties, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, solubility and equilibria, entropy, free energy, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry.

A laboratory course to accompany CHE 107, this course enables students to develop skills appropriate to the first-year chemistry course for science majors. Experiments for this course include: observation of properties and changes, measurements, observing activities and reactions for the various types of reactions, obtaining quantitative and qualitative information regarding products, and the use of computer simulations.

A laboratory course to accompany CHE 108, this course enables students to develop skills appropriate to the first-year chemistry course for science majors. Experiments for this course include: quantifying thermodynamic changes, observing colligative properties, evaluation of chemical kinetics, evaluation of acid/base reactions via titration, and the use of computer simulations.

This course introduces students to the use of computer software and computer programming for data exploration, modeling of natural systems (from biology, chemistry, or physics), information visualization, and instrument/robot control. This is done through independent research where students work in groups to design and pursue computational projects and then critically analyze, interpret and present their findings.

Special Topics in the discipline, designed primarily for sophomores. Students may enroll in 295 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for juniors. Students may enroll in 395 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for seniors who are majors or minors. Students may enroll in 495 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

Free Elective Courses (10 credits):

IT Industry Certification

Industry-sponsored IT certifications are highly recommended as it has become a general practice by employers to demand a relevant college degree as well as IT certifications for entry level professional jobs.

IT Major Internship Requirement

One summer or semester internship is required. Students can start the internship program in their sophomore year. Our in-house internship coordinator and faculty advisor will work closely with each student on internship preparation, placement, and follow-up.

Laptop and ACM Student Membership Requirements

IT majors and minors are required to have their own laptops. Check the IT Program website for minimum system configurations for laptops (PC and Apple Mac). They are also required to join Association of Computing Machinery (www.acm.org), the world’s largest professional, educational, and scientific computing society. An annual student membership fee is $19 with many benefits, such as free online books and courses, career advises, job fairs, student and computing professional networks, and conferences.

Program Outcomes

Communicate effectively with a range of audiences using both written English and American Sign Language.

 

Apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the discipline.

 

Analyze a problem, identify, and define the computing requirements and/or usability specifications appropriate to its solution.

 

Design, implement, and evaluate a computer-based system, process, component or program to effectively integrate IT-based solutions into the user environment.

 

Collaborate effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal.

 

Recognize the importance of professional, ethical, legal, security, and social issues, and adhere to the best practices of the IT profession.

 

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B.S. in Information Technology

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