Academics
Areas of Study

Overview

Overview

Dr. James McCann, Program Director

Sorenson Language and Communication Center, Room 3202

The Master of Science Degree (MS) residential program in Speech-Language Pathology at Gallaudet University is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2200 Research Boulevard #310, Rockville, Maryland 20850, 800-498-2071 or 301-296-5700.

This two-year five-semester program involves coursework and practicum experiences designed to provide a broad background in speech-language-hearing sciences and disorders. The program also provides a special emphasis on the communication differences of many individuals who are d/Deaf and hard-of-hearing.

The SLP program involves combined course, lab, and clinical work in speech, language, hearing and swallowing. Like other nationally-accredited speech-language pathology programs in the United States, Gallaudet’s SLP curriculum is dedicated to speech sciences, research methods, language acquisition, clinical procedures, assistive technology, and multicultural experiences. It also includes instruction in and supervised clinical experiences with persons who have speech sound disorders, motor speech disorders, voice disorders, swallowing disorders, fluency disorders, language disorders, and neurogenic communication disorders. Unlike other accredited graduate programs, however, Gallaudet’s program requires coursework or demonstrated competence in American Sign Language and competencies in working with children and adults who use ASL. Observation and practicum opportunities in the Hearing and Speech Center on campus are complemented with training experiences at a variety of hospitals, clinics, public and private schools, private practices, early childhood programs, and other acute and long-term care facilities in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.

Students accepted into the highly competitive SLP program also have opportunities to engage in research, not only through a dedicated master’s thesis program, but also with faculty mentors in the Department’s research labs and clinic. Opportunities also exist for interprofessional collaboration (IPC), and for elective coursework in other departments and through the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area.

Program specific requirements:

Three letters of reference
Goal Statement
Interview with SLP Program

Courses & Requirements

Summary of Requirements

Semester I - Fall

American Sign Language I: or equivalent

This course involves the study of the processes and variations of speech, language, communication and pre-literacy skills in typically developing infants and children. Emphasis will be given on the assessment of and intervention with pre-school children with language and learning disorders. Units include interdisciplinary views of the child with speech, language, and communication challenges; issues in speech, language, communication, social-emotional, culturally diversity and cognitive development.

This course provides basic information about how speech is produced, the nature of the speech signal, linguistic and phonetic frameworks for viewing speech, the anatomy and physiology of the speech production and auditory system, and processes of speech perception.

This course addresses the clinical procedures used across multiple speech-language pathology settings. All clinical procedures are taught to ensure students' Knowledge and Skills Acquisition (KASA, ASHA, 2005) in the nine clinical areas important to an SLP's scope of practice.

This course introduces statistical concepts and terminology in the context of 1) clinical data collection, analysis, and interpretation, 2) clinical assessment and intervention; 3) interpretation of evidence to support evidence-based practice in clinical decisions-making.

This course focuses on the clinical application of the principles of sign communication in the field of Speech-Language Pathology/Aural Rehabilitation.

This first clinical practicum at the Gallaudet Hearing and Speech Center provides students with at least two clinical assignments (an individual client or small group and a team diagnostic) representing communication differences, delays, disorders, and/or swallowing disorders. Students are also involved in clinical documentation of client progress and in evaluating their clinical own skills over the course of the semester.

The focus of this course is on clinical competencies in aural rehabilitation of deaf, Deaf, and hard-of-hearing adults. Special emphasis is given to the clinical procedures used in the Gallaudet Hearing and Speech Center and AR competencies needed by both SLPs and AUDs to work with adults who acquire hearing loss across the lifespan.

Semester II - Spring

American Sign Language II: or equivalent

This course involves study of the processes and variations of speech, language, communication and literacy skills in typically developing children and adolescents. Emphasis will be given on the assessment of and intervention with school-age children and adolescents with language and learning disorders. Units include interdisciplinary views of and issues with the child with speech, language, and communication challenges; social-emotional, cultural diversity and cognitive development.

This course focuses on the clinical application of the principles of sign communication in the field of Speech-Language Pathology/Aural Rehabilitation.

Motor Speech Disorders is a graduate level course involving the study of speech disorders resulting from central and/or peripheral nervous system damage. The focus of the course is differential diagnosis and management of motor speech disorders in children and adults including the dysarthrias and acquired apraxia of speech. This course will integrate academic and clinical aspects of motor speech disorders.

Provides information concerning etiology, assessment, and treatment of speech and language disruptions associated with various neurological disorders. Areas to be addressed include: review of neural anatomy and physiology, description of right hemisphere communication disorders, cognitive language disorders secondary to head injury and dementia, and apraxia of speech.

This second clinical practicum at the Gallaudet Hearing and Speech Center provides students with at least three, individuals, small group and/or diagnostics with communication disorders, differences, delays, and/or swallowing disorders. Students are also involved clinical documentation and in evaluating their clinical skills over the course of the semester.

Semester III - Summer

Study of the fundamentals of hearing, diagnostic audiologic procedures, special diagnostic procedures for infants, children, and difficult-to-test clients, and interpretation of audiologic test data for communication, psychosocial, and educational purposes.

This third clinical practicum at either the Gallaudet Hearing and Speech Center or an approved off-campus site provides students with individual clients, small groups and/or diagnostic opportunities representing communication differences, delays, disorders, and/or swallowing disorders. Students are also involved in clinical documentation of client progress and in evaluating their clinical own skills over the course of the semester.

The focus of this course is on clinical competencies in aural (re)habilitation of deaf, Deaf, and hard-of-hearing children and their families. Special emphasis is given to the clinical procedures used in the Gallaudet Hearing and Speech Center and AR competencies needed by both AUDs and SLPs to work with children with congenital and acquired hearing loss. The course has a strong interdisciplinary focus, considering ethnic and cultural issues in rehabilitation.

Semester IV - Fall

American Sign Language III: or equivalent

Study of the etiology, theory, nature, development, and treatment of fluency disorders.

Study of the research and principles associated with symptomatology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of speech sound disorders in children and adults. Emphasis is on a broad understanding of the effect of speech sound disorders, including multicultural issues.

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of swallowing disorders (dysphagia) and current approaches to prevention, assessment and treatment of patients with dysphagia. Included in the course topics are: anatomy and physiology of the normal and abnormal swallow with attention to each stage of the swallow; swallowing issues unique to pediatric and adult patients, and issues with caretakers within and across cultures; and contemporary research issues and outcomes. These topics will be integrated to provide students with basic knowledge and skills needed to assess and implement a treatment plan for patients with dysphagia.

This fourth practicum, usually an off-campus internship experience, provides students with supervised practice in either a pediatric or adult placement specializing in one or more of the nine communication and swallowing disorders common to speech-language pathology caseloads.

Semester V - Spring

This course addresses assessment and intervention of individuals with complex communication disorders, including technologies appropriate for augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and evidence-based practices with AAC technologies.

This course focuses on voice and resonance (anatomy and physiology, including pitch, loudness, and quality), pathologies that influence voice and resonance production, strategies for assessing and for intervention that require cross-professional collaboration, and knowledge of evidence-based outcomes; issues in laryngectomy rehabilitation, tracheostomy and ventilator-dependent communication alternatives and diverse cultural issues, and a wide range of assessment and treatment interventions applicable to children and adults.

This fifth practicum, usually an off-campus internship experience, provides students with supervised practice in either a pediatric or adult placement specializing in one or more of the nine communication and swallowing disorders common to speech-language pathology caseloads.

The course is designed to help audiologists and speech-language pathologists work more effectively with their clients in addressing the biopsychosocial effects of hearing loss and other communication disorders. Students will learn about the impact of hearing loss and communication disorders on infants, children, adults, older adults, and significant others. Students will develop a interviewing and specific counseling skills to help clients address their hearing loss and communication-related needs. This course will serve to provide a theoretical framework, practical strategies and personal reflection for working and providing services with cultural and linguistic awareness, knowledge, competency and proficiency.

Program Outcomes

1. Knowledge of statistics as well as the biological, physical, and social/behavioral sciences. (ASHA StandardIV-A).

 

2. Knowledge of basic human communication and swallowing processes, including the appropriate biological, neurological, acoustic, psychological, developmental, linguistic, and cultural bases. Ability to integrate information pertraining to normal and abnormal human development across the lifespan. (ASHA Standard V-B).

 

3. Knowledge of communication and swallowing disorders and differences, including appropriate etiologies, characteristics, anatomical/physiological, acoustic, psychological, developmental, and linguistic and cultural correlates
a. Speech sound production to encompass articulation, motor planning and execution, phonology, and accent modification
b. Fluency and fluency disorders
c. voice and resonance, including respiration and phonation
d. receptive and expressive language including phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics (language use and social aspects of communication, prelinguistic communication, paralinguistic communication (e.g. gestures, signs, body language), and literacy in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.
e. Hearing, including the impact on speech and language
f. Swallowing/feeding including (a) structure and function of orofacial myology and (b) pharyngeal, laryngeal, pulmonary, esophageal, gastrointestinal, and related functions across the life span
g. cognitive aspects of communication, including attention, memory, sequencing, problem solving, and executive functioning
h. social aspects of communication, including challenging behavior, ineffective social skills, and lack of communication opportunities
i. augmentative and alternative communication modalities (Standard IV-C)

 

4. For each of the areas specified in SLO 3- current knowledge of the principles and methods of prevention, assessment, and intervention for persons with communication and swallowing disorders including consideration of anatomical/physiological, developmental, and linguistic and cultural correlates (Standard IV-D and V-B)

 

5. Knowledge and skills in oral, written, and other forms of communication sufficient for entry into professional practice Standard V-A)

 

6. Knowledge of research processes and integration of research principles into evidence-based clinical practice (Standard IV-F)

 

7. Knowledge of ASHA's current Code of Ethics and ethical conduct standards, professional contemporary issues, regulations, and policies relevant to professional practice (Standards IV-E, G, and H)

Accreditation

The Master of Science Degree (MS) residential education program in Speech-Language Pathology at Gallaudet University is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2200 Research Boulevard #310, Rockville, Maryland 20850, 800-498-2071 or 301-296-5700.

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M.S. in Speech-Language Pathology

James McCann

SLCC 3110

(202) 448-7144

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