Academics
Areas of Study

Courses & Requirements

Summary of Requirements

2022-2023
Core Curriculum 43
Pre-Major Courses 9
Major and Related Courses 51
Free Elective Courses 17
TOTAL 120

Required pre-major courses 9 hours

This course covers areas of vocabulary, semantics, grammar and organization of ASL and English. Students look at the linguistic aspects of both languages and compare the two. The class also covers word classes and sentence structure of both languages. To assist students in understanding the structure of both languages, discussion of how languages work is included.

Visual media has changed the way we work with American Sign Language. With the advent of new tools and platforms, possibilities of publishing have proliferated, allowing a wider discourse of ideas to be shared with a vast audience of people who work with ASL and ASL learners. This course explores these opportunities through a hands-on approach and introduces students to the tools and skills necessary to produce digital video, websites, interactive presentations and social media and integrate those with the field of ASL.

An introduction to the major features of languages and to the structure, use, and variation in the sign languages and sign systems commonly used in the United States. The course will cover four major topics: (1) Language: The nature and definition of languages, the uniqueness of language, and contrasts between language and other forms of communication; (2) Language and Culture: The role of language in human society, with special focus on language acquisition, language identity, and bilingualism; (3) American Sign Language Structure: A survey of the major features of the linguistic structure of ASL. Topics are: Phonology: the structure of the physical signals; Morphology: the basic structure and composition of meaningful units of ASL; Syntax: word order and nonmanual syntactic signals in ASL sentences; (4) Language Variation: Language variation and language contact in the deaf community, including discussions of contact varieties of signing and systems for representing English.

Required major courses 48 hours

This course is designed to expose students to the variety of features in ASL by recognizing and considering the ways those features are demonstrated in naturalistic data. Students will compile a collection of data sets, which will allow them to investigate ASL features. Critical analysis of ASL features including ASL fingerspelling, sentence types, and non-manual aspects of the language reinforces students' abilities in creating, utilizing, and analyzing ASL materials for the purpose of academic research, pedagogy, and resources.

This course is designed to continue students' exposure to the variety of features in ASL by recognizing and considering the ways those features are demonstrated in naturalistic data. Students will compile a collection of data sets, which will allow them to investigate ASL features. Critical analysis of ASL features including ASL depiction, discourse features, and ASL registers reinforces students' abilities in creating, utilizing, and analyzing ASL materials for the purpose of academic research, pedagogy, and resources.

This course provides an overview of various genres in American Sign Language Narratives ranging from visual vernacular to fictional narratives. Students will analyze contents, themes and stylistic techniques of works done by various ASL literary artists. This course emphasizes practices in planning, developing, performing and critiquing various narrative genres.

This course provides an overview of various genres in American Sign Language Poetics ranging from ABC Stories to Poetry. Students will analyze contents, themes and stylistic techniques of works done by various ASL literary artists. This course emphasizes practices in planning, developing, performing and critiquing various works in the poetics genres.

This course introduces the concept of analysis and criticism of ASL texts. Students will learn how to provide feedback to other students who are doing ASL assignments in various disciplines. Students analyze the components of a variety of ASL rubrics and will prepare for the role of serving as an ASL tutor.

This course covers elocution, in other words, registers of ASL discourse -- frozen, formal, consultative, casual and intimate. Students will be able to discuss using ASL in the most common registers (formals, consultative and casual) in classrooms or at social events. They will also learn how to refine their skills in giving presentations using formal ASL.

This course demonstrates the use of space and eye gaze. It also demonstrates the use of role shifting to indicate speaker or locus of the subject/object in the ASL text. Organization of an ASL text and the function of these features will be covered. How they overlap with other features of the language will also be covered. Turn-taking regulators will be discussed within the conversation style of a discourse text.

This course will provide an overview of the role of attitudes and ethics in language, including an overview of differing ideologies' impact on the use and acceptance of sign language in our society, ranging from early intervention to the education system including neuroethics. International applications will be provided, including ethics of teaching American Sign Language in other countries. A framework of current challenges along with potential solutions will be discussed with applications to students' lives and experiences.

This course focuses on understanding the deaf community's longstanding campaigns for sign language rights from an advocacy perspective. Topics covered include the history and status of sign language in education, language planning, policies and legislation on the state, national and international levels, as well as advocacy campaigns and organizations related to sign language rights.

This course introduces ASL majors to the field of ASL instruction. Areas covered will be methods, curriculum and training in the field. Discussion of ASLTA certification will be covered as well. Students will be able to observe ASL classes to assist them in understanding the pedagogy of ASL teaching.

This course introduces ASL majors to the application of ASL instruction. Areas covered will be applied to ASL teaching methods, ASL curriculum and ASL training in the field. Discussion of ASLTA certification will be covered as well. Students will be able to apply ASL resource development to assist them in understanding the pedagogy of ASL instruction.

The course is designed to give students the opportunity to develop an integrated research approach to the study of ASL in preparation for ASL senior seminar. This course will guide students in developing research questions, methodologies, data analysis and interpretation. Students will be encouraged to share their findings to public audiences.

This capstone course is required for those students who complete the prerequisite courses, and it is to enable them to review their prior learning in the program. The course is also designed to give students the opportunity to develop an integrated approach to the study of ASL. Students will be expected to do at least one research paper on a selected topic to be approved by the faculty member.

This course will begin with developing an understanding of the concept of ¿culture¿ and then will focus on the complexities and varieties of Deaf cultural experiences. Students will be asked to engage course materials through multi-disciplinary approaches in order to gain a critical appreciation of Deaf lives within historical, political and global contexts.

This course examines various forms of oppression by looking across different cultures and communities, then examines possible parallels occurring within the deaf community.

This course provides an introductory overview of the major linguistic structures of American Sign Language. Major topics are: phonology, morphology, syntax, language use, and linguistic applications. Some comparisons with English and other spoken and signed languages will be examined.

One elective ASL course from the following: 3 hours

This course is intended as a cumulative application of theories and methods learned in previous courses. Students will, with approval from internship supervisor and cooperating supervisor, select an internship site and responsibilities equivalent to number of credit hours earned. The responsibilities may include ASL tutoring, teaching, consulting, modeling, diagnosis, research and/or resource development. Students are responsible for reporting and reflecting on weekly responsibilities and attending weekly seminars with other interns. The reports and reflections will be integrated in an internship portfolio checked periodically throughout the semester by both the cooperating supervisor and the internship supervisor.

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for seniors who are majors or minors. Students may enroll in 495 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

A project in the area of the student's special interest as it relates to sign communication. Title indicating the content must be available at time of registration.

Program Outcomes

1. Demonstrate theoretical and analytical knowledge of ASL linguistics and Literature.

 

2. Theoretical and analytical knowledge of the role of ASL in education, politics, and media.

 

3. Students in the program will produce college-level ASL and English texts that demonstrate knowledge of, and critical inquiry into, key concepts in the ASL discipline.

 

4. Students of the program will recognize the importance of the ASL expert as a system change agent and apply this in practice inside and outside the classroom utilizing effective leadership, advocacy, consultation, and collaboration to influence change on the individual, group, and organizational and systemic levels.

 

5. Demonstrate preparation for future career employment in the field of ASL

 

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B.A. in American Sign Language

Felicia Williams

Kenneth De Haan

202-250-2043

202-448-7067

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