Academics
Areas of Study

Overview

Overview

Web: Department of Education

Dr. Julie Mitchiner, Program Director
Fowler Hall, Room 302B

 

The MA in Deaf Education Studies is designed for teachers and other education professionals who seek the opportunity to acquire more in-depth knowledge in deaf education. The program is offered in online, hybrid, and onsite formats and may be completed in one year of full-time study or two years of part-time study.

Three specializations are offered at this time: Educating Students with Disabilities (online), ASL/English Bilingual Early Childhood Education (online), and Self-Designed (onsite or hybrid).

The MA in Deaf Education Studies program is not intended to lead to licensure and does not lead to licensure in Washington, D.C.

Admissions Procedures

Applicants for the M.A. in Deaf Education: Advanced Studies must complete the application procedures and meet the requirements for graduate study at Gallaudet University. Visit the Graduate Admissions website for more information and a checklist of application requirements.

DEADLINE DATE
First Date for Consideration of Application: Feb. 15th
Last Date for Completed Application: June 30

Program Specific Requirements

  • Minimum 3.0 GPA
  • At least two of the following artifacts demonstrating ASL skills:
    o ASLPI result of 2 or above
    o Video goal statement
    o Video of yourself teaching
  • A bachelor’s degree in Education, Deaf Education, Special Education, Counseling, Social Work and/or any related fields or a bachelor’s degree in another field with at least 2 years of experience teaching in an educational setting
  • License/certificate of teaching (optional). If you wish to attach your license/certificate to your application, please email it to gradapplications@gallaudet.edu.
  • One letter of recommendation must address: Evidence of successful paid or volunteer work with infants, children, or adolescents and/or families (at least two years).

Program of Study

Program Requirement

Candidates in the Deaf Education Studies program are required to complete a capstone project that will result in a product and presentation. Each candidate works with the advisor to identify members to serve on the capstone committee.

The capstone proposal must include: (1) a justification for the project; (2) goals and learning outcomes; (3) learning activities; and (4) assessments of the learning outcomes. The proposal must also specify the nature of the product and a plan for the presentation.

The committee will meet with the candidate to review and approve the proposal within two weeks of the submission. An approved capstone proposal must be signed off by the MA program director. Final capstone projects must be submitted to the committee and to the MA program director at least one month prior to graduation. 

Courses & Requirements

Summary of Requirements

Fall 1

The focus of this course is research as a strategy of inquiry for improving practice and advancing our professions. The general principles of qualitative, quantitative, and action research designs will be considered, along with related problems of measurement, statement and clarification of research problems, and basic statistical methods for describing data. The goal is to produce professionals who are consumers of research in their fields who can apply research for the improvement of their school or work settings.

This capstone project course provides the opportunity for candidates in the Advanced Studies Program, Special Program & Graduate Certificate programs to apply and demonstrate skills, knowledge, and dispositions developed throughout the courses in the program through completing a self-designed capstone project. Candidates will complete their proposal plan for the capstone project by the end of the fall semester.

Spring 1

This capstone project course provides the opportunity for candidates in the Advanced Studies Program, Special Program & Graduate Certificate programs to apply and demonstrate skills, knowledge, and dispositions developed throughout the courses in the program through completing a self-designed capstone project. Candidates will show evidences of making progress with the capstone project by the end of the spring semester.

Fall 1

This course is designed to educate candidates about state and federal education policies, particularly as they pertain to bilingualism. In addition, the course addresses a basic working knowledge of regulations essential to the role and as bilingual early childhood professionals. Candidates will implement policies and regulations using the language planning framework in their work in homes, schools and agencies, and the community. It elaborates and builds upon knowledge and dispositions learned in foundation courses.

This course introduces the candidates theoretical perspectives and current research of bilingualism. It is designed for the candidates to acquire an understanding of the concepts related to the development of bilingual language abilities (signacy, oracy, and literacy) for children 0-5 years of age. This course examines bilingual communities, bilingual deaf and hearing children and their language development and use, the bilingual brain, language maintenance and shift, transference, code switching and language attitudes. The course will also address historical and cultural aspects of bilingualism in early childhood deaf children.

This capstone project course provides the opportunity for candidates in the Advanced Studies Program, Special Program & Graduate Certificate programs to apply and demonstrate skills, knowledge, and dispositions developed throughout the courses in the program through completing a self-designed capstone project. Candidates will complete their proposal plan for the capstone project by the end of the fall semester.

This course uses a disability studies approach to familiarize students with major trends and issues in special education with a focus on deaf students with disabilities. Topics include historical roots, perception of disability, policies impacting students with disabilities, labeling, overrepresentation, and discipline. Other topics in the course include research in the education of deaf students with disabilities, developing Individualized Education Plans (IEPs), examining instructional practices, and working with families.

This course provides an overview of functional academics for deaf students with disabilities. Topics include teaching vocational skills, teaching life skills, supporting motor development, supporting social-emotional development, developing transition plans, and selecting assistive technology devices. Course assignments are designed to allow students to apply these concepts in their current teaching setting.

Spring 1

The focus of this course is research as a strategy of inquiry for improving practice and advancing our professions. The general principles of qualitative, quantitative, and action research designs will be considered, along with related problems of measurement, statement and clarification of research problems, and basic statistical methods for describing data. The goal is to produce professionals who are consumers of research in their fields who can apply research for the improvement of their school or work settings.

This course describes the early development of ASL and English in young deaf and hard of hearing children and their impact on cognitive development. The course examines how deaf and hard of hearing children go through developmental stages of acquiring and learning American Sign Language, which is similar to how hearing children go through developmental stages of acquiring a spoken language and how this development is tied to cognitive functions that are the precursors for further linguistic and academic growth (sign babbling, sign jargon, first words, ASL grammatical development and vocabulary expansion). In addition, the course will address factors intrinsic to the bilingual child as well as to the environment that promote and/or prevent their linguistic and cognitive development.

This course will address individualized planning for language and emergent literacy development that can be used as a guide for teaching and learning interventions to support a child's linguistic competence in American Sign Language (ASL) and English. Candidates will apply various American Sign Language (ASL) and English assessment tools to explore ways of assessing diverse deaf and hard-of-hearing candidates' language and literacy acquisition and learning at home and at school. Based on the results of these assessments, the Candidates will reflect on and identify the bilingual methodology approaches to meet the ASL and English language and literacy needs of candidates. They will apply these strategies to home plan, lesson and unit planning, and within their settings.

This capstone project course provides the opportunity for candidates in the Advanced Studies Program, Special Program & Graduate Certificate programs to apply and demonstrate skills, knowledge, and dispositions developed throughout the courses in the program through completing a self-designed capstone project. Candidates will show evidences of making progress with the capstone project by the end of the spring semester.

Summer 1

This course is designed to prepare the candidates to apply an ASL/English Bilingual Framework in Early Childhood Education for deaf and hard of hearing children. This framework describes how the acquisition and learning of ASL and English (written and spoken) are being facilitated. This course reflects upon bilingual models and concepts and discusses the language planning process required to establish an environment that demonstrates value for both languages. Also, it focuses on meeting the needs of the deaf and hard of hearing children and families that it serves. Use of bilingual methodologies, assessment, effective strategies, and language teaching including signacy, oracy and literacy and critical pedagogy will be addressed.

ASL and English Bilingualism at home and in school promotes healthy language development and communication, and creates positive self-esteem among deaf/hard of hearing children from diverse backgrounds. This course/seminar is designed for professionals to acquire the knowledge and skills to work collaboratively with diverse families and other professionals to support the bilingual development and education of young deaf and hard of hearing children. Participants will discuss a working model of bilingual language acquisition (American Sign Language and English), approaches to providing support and encouragement to families, ways to promote positive communication with families, and the creation of culturally responsive and inclusive early childhood educational communities for all families. IN addition, participants will apply a basic working knowledge of Part C and Part B of the IDEA regulations as members of an early childhood education team.

Fall 1

This course is designed to educate candidates about state and federal education policies, particularly as they pertain to bilingualism. In addition, the course addresses a basic working knowledge of regulations essential to the role and as bilingual early childhood professionals. Candidates will implement policies and regulations using the language planning framework in their work in homes, schools and agencies, and the community. It elaborates and builds upon knowledge and dispositions learned in foundation courses.

This course introduces the candidates theoretical perspectives and current research of bilingualism. It is designed for the candidates to acquire an understanding of the concepts related to the development of bilingual language abilities (signacy, oracy, and literacy) for children 0-5 years of age. This course examines bilingual communities, bilingual deaf and hearing children and their language development and use, the bilingual brain, language maintenance and shift, transference, code switching and language attitudes. The course will also address historical and cultural aspects of bilingualism in early childhood deaf children.

This capstone project course provides the opportunity for candidates in the Advanced Studies Program, Special Program & Graduate Certificate programs to apply and demonstrate skills, knowledge, and dispositions developed throughout the courses in the program through completing a self-designed capstone project. Candidates will complete their proposal plan for the capstone project by the end of the fall semester.

This course uses a disability studies approach to familiarize students with major trends and issues in special education with a focus on deaf students with disabilities. Topics include historical roots, perception of disability, policies impacting students with disabilities, labeling, overrepresentation, and discipline. Other topics in the course include research in the education of deaf students with disabilities, developing Individualized Education Plans (IEPs), examining instructional practices, and working with families.

This course provides an overview of functional academics for deaf students with disabilities. Topics include teaching vocational skills, teaching life skills, supporting motor development, supporting social-emotional development, developing transition plans, and selecting assistive technology devices. Course assignments are designed to allow students to apply these concepts in their current teaching setting.

Spring 1

The focus of this course is research as a strategy of inquiry for improving practice and advancing our professions. The general principles of qualitative, quantitative, and action research designs will be considered, along with related problems of measurement, statement and clarification of research problems, and basic statistical methods for describing data. The goal is to produce professionals who are consumers of research in their fields who can apply research for the improvement of their school or work settings.

This capstone project course provides the opportunity for candidates in the Advanced Studies Program, Special Program & Graduate Certificate programs to apply and demonstrate skills, knowledge, and dispositions developed throughout the courses in the program through completing a self-designed capstone project. Candidates will show evidences of making progress with the capstone project by the end of the spring semester.

This course introduces students to a variety of classroom management approaches and techniques, with an emphasis on working with students who have disabilities. Students are provided with a foundation and background in behavior management and discipline in special education. They will also consider theories and techniques that apply to individual students, classroom communities, and schoolwide communities.

Students in the class will focus on concepts and methods of assessment in special education with an emphasis on administering, scoring, interpreting, and reporting on standardized educational tests. In addition, emphasis will be placed on administration and interpretation of formal and informal diagnostic procedures, diagnostic reports, IEP development, and professional ethics.

Summer 1

This course is designed to prepare graduate students to address issues related to language and literacy development for deaf students with disabilities. Topics include language and communication disorders, augmentative and alternative communication systems, cultural influence on language and literacy development, and how language and communication impact classroom performance. The course will also provide strategies to promote metacognitive skills and literacy development.

The course reviews what it means to be an effective teacher and introduces the concepts of universal design for learning (UDL) as well as differentiation to meet the needs of deaf students who have disabilities. Further studied is the concept of multiple literacies and access to content and opportunity for the development of literate and metacognitive thought. The lesson plan format is augmented with the development of tiered lessons by addressing three levels of content, process and/or product expectations as determined by interest level, learning style or readiness. In addition, candidates will become familiar with a variety of instructional strategies based on evidence-based practice in general and special education, the hierarchy of cognitive applications in Bloom's Taxonomy, Barbara Given's 5 natural learning systems, Robert Sternberg's Triarchic Intelligence model, as well as Howard Gardner's multiple intelligences. Evidence of learning focuses on the student's ability to prepare and teach developed lesson plans, and document student learning in clear and concise manner using visual documentation strategies. Candidates are taught to encourage a) self-regulation and other self-determination skills in their students; b) social interaction and true discussion as a method for developing metacognition; and c) developing receptive and expressive learning pathways for academic discourse.

Program Outcomes

Conceptual Framework 

 

All school preparation programs share four key principles:

 

1. Promotes Bilingual/Bicultural Competence

 

a) Fluent in ASL (S)

 

b) Competent in written English (S)

 

c) Creates a visual learning environment (S)

 

d) Knows the histories, cultures, and contexts of deaf/Deaf people (K)

 

e) Assures access to language through a variety of strategies (S)

 

f) Develop lessons that address diverse linguistic backgrounds of students (S)

 

g) Communicates effectively across diverse cultures, varying education & cognitive levels (S)

 

h) Works effectively within a culturally diverse team of professionals (S)

 

i) Values and responds to language diversity and development in students (S, D)

 

j) Demonstrates leadership, advocacy and the ability to navigate biculturally (S, D)

 

 

 

2. Engages in Theory-Based Practice

 

a) Shows knowledge of subject matter (K)

 

b) Utilizes subject matter knowledge to prepare and teach curriculum that supports learning of content by all students (S)

 

c) Knows how children and youth develop and the implications of that development for teaching and learning (K)

 

d) Modifies professional practice to be appropriate for diverse students including multiple language, ethnicity, multiple and varied intelligences, gender, and abilities (S)

 

e) Uses knowledge of learners and learning to assess, plan professional practice, respond, assess, and revise professional practice (action research) (S)

 

f) Locates professional resources for self, students, families, and communities through a variety of technologies (S, D)

 

g) Critically examines theory and research in order to apply to professional practice (S, D)

 

h) Models a passion for learning and teaching (D)

 

 

 

3. Acts as a Reflective Change Agent

 

a) Identifies one’s own strengths, weaknesses, and learning needs and is resourceful in building their capacity as a professional (S,D )

 

b) Gathers evidence of the impact of their professional practice; analyzes evidence, reflects, decides what to do next (S)

 

c) Identifies own biases, values, beliefs, worldview, and the impact of these on their relationships with learners (S, D)

 

d) Collaborates with others in ways that enhance their knowledge, skills, and dispositions as a professional (S)

 

e) Interacts ethically and professional at all times with students, families, colleagues and community members (D)

 

f) Advocates for learners and for social justice (S, D)

 

 

 

4. Promotes the intellectual, linguistic, and social potential of all children with a particular focus on deaf and hard-of-hearing children and youth.

 

a) Understands learners in the context of their environment and culture and modifies professional practices to be culturally appropriate to learners (K, S)

 

b) Monitors and evaluates one’s own values and their effects on practice and diverse groups (S, D)

 

c) Shows respect and sensitivity in words and actions towards those who are culturally different from self (D)

 

d) Demonstrates a belief that all children and families can learn and a commitment to enabling learning for all (D)

 

e) Demonstrates a rapport with diverse students that reflects respect for and acceptance of their potential for improvement and success (S, D)

 

f) Shows a commitment to continue to learn new knowledge and skills in order to work effectively with diverse learners (D)

 

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M.A. in Deaf Education Studies

Julie Mitchiner

202-250-2043

202-448-7067

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