Academics
Areas of Study

Overview

Overview

The Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry provides an opportunity for a chemistry major to take a more rigorous calculus-based course of study in chemistry. This option prepares the student for graduate study in chemistry and for most entry-level positions as chemists in industry and government.

For continuation in the major, the student must maintain a cumulative degree average of 2.0 or better in chemistry courses numbered 300 and above.

Courses & Requirements

Summary of Requirements

2022-2023
Core Curriculum 43
Pre-Major Courses 5
Major and Required Courses 72
Free Elective Courses 4
TOTAL 120*

*Category totals do not add up to 120 because required pre-major and major courses overlap with GSR requirements. For MAT 130, three hours count toward the general studies requirement, replacing GSR 104.

Requirements for a Major in Chemistry with a B.S. Degree

The Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry provides an opportunity for a chemistry major to take a more rigorous calculus-based course of study in chemistry. This option prepares the student for graduate study in chemistry and for most entry-level positions as chemists in industry and government.

For continuation in the major, the student must maintain a cumulative degree average of 2.0 or better in chemistry courses numbered 300 and above. In addition, a chemistry major must complete two internships in the field.

Required pre-major courses 5 hours

MAT 130: Three hours count towards the general studies requirement, replacing GSR 104.

A grade of C or higher in CHE 107 and CHE 109 or a letter of recommendation from our chemistry faculty.

Designed for science majors, this is the first of a two-semester sequence and is designed to help students become familiar with the properties and reactions of matter. This course will also address modern applications of these concepts. Specific topics for this course include: observation of properties and changes, scientific method, unit conversions and measurements, chemical formulas, balancing equations, predicting products and yields, reactions and reaction types, the Ideal Gas Law, thermodynamics, molecular and atomic structure of matter, and orbital hybridization.

A laboratory course to accompany CHE 107, this course enables students to develop skills appropriate to the first-year chemistry course for science majors. Experiments for this course include: observation of properties and changes, measurements, observing activities and reactions for the various types of reactions, obtaining quantitative and qualitative information regarding products, and the use of computer simulations.

This course emphasizes the meaning and application of the concepts of functions. It covers polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions and their graphs, trigonometric identities. Passing both MAT 125 and 126 is equivalent to passing MAT 130.

Required chemistry courses 39 hours

Designed for science majors, this course is the second of a two-semester sequence and is designed to help students become familiar with the properties and reactions of matter. This course will also address modern applications of these concepts. Specific topics for this course include: chemical bonding concepts, solution chemistry, colligative properties, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, solubility and equilibria, entropy, free energy, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry.

A laboratory course to accompany CHE 108, this course enables students to develop skills appropriate to the first-year chemistry course for science majors. Experiments for this course include: quantifying thermodynamic changes, observing colligative properties, evaluation of chemical kinetics, evaluation of acid/base reactions via titration, and the use of computer simulations.

This course is designed to give an introduction to the chemistry of carbon-hydrogen compounds, also known as organic chemistry. Students will study the structures, properties, synthesis, and uses of organic compounds and learn important classes of organic compounds including alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, heterocycles, carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. Organic reactions will be discussed including addition, substitution, oxidation, reduction, polymerization and synthesis of organometallic reagents.

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence. A functional group approach to organic chemistry is presented, with an emphasis on alkenes, alkynes, aromatic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and amines. Students will study the structures, properties, synthesis, identification and uses of organic compounds and learn important classes of organic compounds and practice use of instrumentation commonly used in organic chemistry. A number of organic reactions will be covered including addition to carbonyl compounds, substitution at carbonyl positions and aromatic positions, oxidation of alcohols and aldeydes, reduction of aldehydes, ketones and other carbonyl compounds, polymerization and organometallic reactions with carbonyl compounds.

A laboratory course to accompany CHE 211. This course consists of one three-hour laboratory session per week. The laboratory covers the techniques for preparing, purifying, analysis and identification of organic compounds. Students will carry out experiments aimed at studying the structures, properties, synthesis, and uses of organic compounds and learn important classes of organic compounds. Students will also learn and use analytical instruments, including the FTIR spectrometer, precision balances, and the GC-MS.

A laboratory course to accompany CHE 212. This course consists of one three-hour laboratory session per week. This class covers the techniques for preparing, purifying, analysis, and identification of organic compounds. Several organic reactions will be covered including addition, substitution, oxidation, reduction, polymerization and organometallic reactions. Students will learn to perform some important organic procedures like Grignard reactions, Ester synthesis, nitration and soap synthesis. Students will also learn and use analytical instruments, including the FTIR spectrometer, GC-MS, and the NMR spectrometer.

This course introduces students to the use of computer software and computer programming for data exploration, modeling of natural systems (from biology, chemistry, or physics), information visualization, and instrument/robot control. This is done through independent research where students work in groups to design and pursue computational projects and then critically analyze, interpret and present their findings.

This is the first course of a two-semester course sequence on basic quantitative methods of chemical analysis. This course focuses on basic analytical tools, such as measurements, analysis of experimental errors, gravimetric methods and volumetric analysis.

This is the second and last course of a one-year course sequence on basic quantitative methods of chemical analysis. The second semester covers instrumental topics, such as potentiometry, spectroscopy, analytical separations, chromatographic methods and quality assurance.

This is the first laboratory course of a two-laboratory course sequence, focusing on applications of the basic quantitative methods of chemical analysis in the laboratory. The course focuses on basis analytical tools, such as measurements, analysis of experimental errors, quality assurance, gravimetric methods and volumetric analysis. Two three-hour laboratory sessions per week.

This is the second and last laboratory course of the two-laboratory course sequence, focusing on applications of the basic quantitative methods of chemical analysis in the laboratory. This course focuses on instrumental methods, such as pH, spectroscopy, analytical separations and chromatographic methods. Two three-hour laboratory sessions per week.

Application of modern chemical theories of structures, bonds, and reactions to inorganic substances.

This is the first course of a two-semester sequence. This course will cover the principles of physical chemistry in the areas of thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, equilibrium, transport properties and reaction kinetics. Applications will be chosen to illustrate how these principles are used to describe biomolecular behavior such as in osmosis, ion channels, proteins or bioenergetics.

This is the second course of a two-semester sequence. This course will cover the fundamentals of quantum mechanics and spectroscopy, and their applications in chemical and biological phenomena. In other words, it explores how the strangest aspect of nature is manifested in biology and chemistry. Once the fundamentals are covered, the course will dwell on the latest findings in the interface between biology and quantum mechanics such as in bioenergetics, mind and consciousness, genes, ion channels or photosynthesis.

This is the laboratory companion to the Physical Chemistry for Biosciences (CHE 331) course. This laboratory will cover applications of thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, equilibrium, transport properties and reaction kinetics. Laboratory experiments will include student training for computational and wet lab experiment techniques, data collection, analysis and interpretation.

This is the laboratory companion for the Quantum Biology course (CHE 332). This laboratory will cover the applications of quantum mechanics as manifested in the modern electronic structure theory and computational chemistry as well as spectroscopy and polarization. Laboratory experiments will include training for computational and wet lab experiment techniques, data collection, analysis and interpretation.

This course is for STM majors who are in their last year of the program. Students will produce two major products: (1) a grant proposal to a national or private agency and (2)interdisciplinary group project. In addition, students will discuss future career plans,examine contributions of different deaf scientists to science, and engage in discussions on science ethics and science literacy.

Choose one course from the following:

A study of the principles and reactions that involve proteins and DNA in biological systems. The course investigates the structure and chemistry of amino acids, the combination of the amino acids in the formation of proteins, the function and structure of proteins, the building blocks of DNA, the chemistry and structure of DNA, the structure of RNA, the replication of DNA, and current topics in biochemical/biomedical engineering.

A study of the principles and reactions that occur upon the intake of nutrients (including carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins) in biological systems. The course will evaluate the processes by which nutrients are metabolized. The breakdown of substances taken in from the environment will be studied. This will be followed by an analysis of the reactions that create the molecules necessary and usable by living organisms.

Required related courses 27 hours

BIO 201: Four hours count toward the general studies requirement, replacing GSR 230

This course covers the fundamentals of biomolecules, cell physiology, respiration and photosynthesis, and genetics. In laboratory, students will develop and test hypotheses by designing their own experiments to better understand different biological concepts. Students will also learn how to use a microscope and pipettors and will write laboratory reports in the same format as professional journal articles. This is one of two courses of introductory biology for science majors. BIO107 and BIO108 can be taken in either order. BIO 107 and BIO 108 are designed for students who want to major in biology or another science, or who plan to attend dental, veterinary, or medical school after graduation. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

This course will provide an overview of descriptive and experimental research methods in the sciences. Topics include research design and methodology, statistical analyses, responsible conduct of research, the use of animal and human subjects, and the critical analysis of published peer-reviewed research reports. Students will work in groups to design a research project, collect and analyze pilot data, and present the results. Development of scientific writing skills will be emphasized. Four hours of lecture per week.

Limit processes, including the concepts of limits, continuity, differentiation, the natural logarithm and exponential functions, and integration of functions. Applications to physical problems will be discussed.

Applications of integration, inverse functions, and hyperbolic functions. Techniques of integration, sequences, series of numbers and functions, and Taylor series.

This introductory physics course develops a view of the universe as a clocklike mechanism where change is continuous, observers do not affect their measurements, identical experiments yield identical outcomes and the laws of physics are never violated. It uses methods of calculus to investigate topics in the kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies, phases of matter, geometrical optics, optical instruments and Einstein's theory of relativity.

This introductory physics course develops a view of the universe as a realm of uncertain possibilities, where change may be discontinuous, measuring may cause different experimental results, identical experiments yield many different outcomes and the laws of physics are violated under certain conditions. It uses methods of calculus to investigate topics in electricity and magnetism, vibrations, wave motion, quantum physics, atomic and nuclear physics, heat, ideal gas laws, thermodynamics, and quantum statistical physics.

This is the companion laboratory course to PHY151. Through a sequence of selected experiments, students will practice experiment design, report writing, use of standard instruments, data visualization, and error analysis skills.

This is the companion laboratory course to PHY152. Through a sequence of selected experiments, students will practice experiment design, report writing, use of standard instruments, data visualization, and error analysis skills.

Required Electives

Choose a minimum of 6 credits from the following list or substitute other courses with the approval of the program director

Biomedical/Life Sciences

This course provides an overview of modern genetics, including classical Mendelian genetics, molecular genetics, genomics, and population genetics. Laboratory activities will introduce students to basic statistical and computational techniques and tools, organisms used in genetics laboratories including E. coli and Drosophila melanogaster, and wet lab techniques including gel lectrophoresis, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and DNA fingerprinting using STR polymorphism analysis. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

A general survey of the microorganisms, with emphasis on their morphology, physiology, growth, and methods of isolation and identification. Laboratory activities will introduce students to wet lab techniques including staining and microscopy, pipetting, streaking, preparing media, spread and pour plating, serial dilutions, plate count assays, metabolic tests for identification of bacteria, bacterial transformations and phage stock preparation. Three hours of lecture and two two-hour laboratories per week

The first part of a two-semester course sequence, this course will study the various systems of the body from a combined anatomical and physiological standpoint, with laboratory experiments which illustrate their structure and function. Students will develop their critical thinking skills by analyzing hypothetical problems relating to anatomy and physiology; many of these problems will have medical applications. The first semester will focus on the following organ systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and special sensory. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

The second part of a two-semester course sequence, this course will cover the remaining physiological systems of the body Students will develop their critical thinking skills by analyzing hypothetical problems relating to anatomy and physiology; many of these problems will have medical applications. This semester will focus on the following organ systems: endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and male and female reproductive systems. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

This course is cross-listed and is otherwise known as HSL 785. This course provides the student with a better understanding of pharmacology from chemical and biochemical perspectives. The areas covered in this course include: classifications of drugs, routes of ingestion, chemical and biochemical structures of medications, metabolism of drugs, effects of drugs, and the relationship between the structures of some drugs and the structures of some important chemicals in the body. The course also covers material specifically related to ototoxic medications.

Forensics

This course investigates the chemical aspects and applications of forensics studies. The lecture and the laboratory provide a means to develop skills in the following areas: soil analysis and organic analysis, fingerprint analysis and foot print analysis, hair analysis, fiber analysis, physical evidence evaluation, document examination, forensic anthropology, forensic toxicology and drug analysis.

A critical study of the major theories justifying the punishment of criminals, including retributivism, consequentialism, and hybrid and alternative approaches. Arguments about the appropriateness of certain punishments, such as the death penalty and felon disenfranchisement, will also be considered. Emphasis will be on analysis and evaluation of complex texts and on ethical debate.

The course will examine each of the different parts of the American criminal justice system (policing, courts, and corrections), the procedural laws governing the system, and the ways the various parts of the system are interrelated and interdependent. The interaction between the Deaf community and the criminal justice system will be used as a special case, and students will learn about their rights as deaf individuals and how to protect those rights.

This course examines the social construction of deviance. That is, it examines how society makes rules for behavior, how those rules change over time, and who tends to benefit (and who tends to be limited) because of society's rules. The question of whether deviance is ''good'' or ''bad'' for society will also be examined. Finally, the course will consider what happens to people who break society's rules, both in terms of how society views rule-breakers and how they view themselves.

Mathematics

Vectors, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line integrals, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and Stokes Theorem. Applications to physical problems will be given.

This course is the first part of a two-semester sequence with MAT 314, with a focus on basic probability. It covers descriptive statistics, sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distribution of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions, and the central limit theorem.

This course is the second part of a two-semester course sequence with MAT 313, with a focus on applied statistics. It covers basic statistical concepts, graphical displays of data, sampling distribution models, hypothesis testing, and confidence intervals. A statistical software package is used.

Numerical differentiation, integration, interpolation, approximation of data, approximation of functions, iterative methods of solving nonlinear equations, and numerical solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations.

Programming

This course introduces fundamental concepts of computer programming. Students learn program logic, flow charting, and problem solving through analysis, development, basic debugging and testing procedures. Topics include variables, expressions, data types, functions, decisions, loops, and arrays. Students will use the knowledge and skills gained throughout this course to develop a variety of simple programs.

In this course, students learn problem-solving and programming coding skills to develop software applications/tools. Students are introduced to a high-level programming language. Topics include data types, selections, loops, methods, arrays, objects and classes, strings and text I/O, arithmetic and logic operations, control structures and error handling. Students will learn techniques to design, code, debug, and document programs through hands-on programming projects.

This course continues the development of the principles of a high-level programming language introduced in the Programming Language I course. Topics include: data abstraction, encapsulation, overloaded and overridden methods, inheritance, polymorphism, even-driven programming, and exception handling.

This course introduces internet technology and the principles and techniques necessary for successful web development. Topics such as HTML5, Cascading Style Sheets, JavaScript, DOM, jQuery, multimedia, web page design and web site publishing are presented. Students will learn to develop attractive and interactive web pages and applications.

This course emphasizes on building dynamic Internet and web-based applications that interact with other applications and databases. Students will learn a variety of scripting languages, such as JavaScript and JQuery for client side scripting and PHP for server-side scripting, and Web database connectivity and XML technologies. Students will carry out teamwork to design, implement, and evaluate various Web projects.

Writing

Surveys genres and modalities of professional writing, including social media and writing for the web. Provides an overview of areas such as digital publishing, new media journalism, business and technical writing, and editing. Develops a rhetorical understanding of professional writing as the ability to write in response to elements including audience, purpose, medium, and design.

Introduction to composition of texts using desktop publishing software and computer technology. Focuses on the writing conventions and standards of professional communication, as well as editing techniques and competencies. Also covers design principles, typography, layout and production techniques. When offered for 4 credits, this course will be cross-listed with GSR 210, 220, or 240 and will address the Student Learning Outcomes of these courses.

Study and intensive practice of writing in digital environments, with a focus on journalistic contexts. Examines technical and rhetorical features of online environments, including interactivity, hyperlinking, spatial orientation, and non-linear storytelling. Focuses on the writing conventions and standards of digital media, as well as editing techniques and competencies.

Study and intensive practice of composition in social media genres. Examines rhetorical conventions for digital communication and the dissemination of information through social media for professional purposes, including developing a social media content strategy and analytics. Integrates editing techniques and competencies. May also cover theoretical issues such as copyright and authorship, visual literacy, and moderation of collaborative online environments.

Study and intensive practices of inventing, shaping, producing, and delivering text, audio, video, and images aesthetically and purposefully. Examines various genres of and technical platforms for multimedia composition. Integrates editing techniques and competencies. May also cover theoretical issues relevant to digital media such as universal access and participatory culture.

Study of media literacy, including techniques and strategies used to analyze the use of diverse media to inform, entertain, and sell. Examines diverse media messages in advertisements, television, film, newspapers, magazines, and the Internet.

Recommended courses

In this course, students learn problem-solving and programming coding skills to develop software applications/tools. Students are introduced to a high-level programming language. Topics include data types, selections, loops, methods, arrays, objects and classes, strings and text I/O, arithmetic and logic operations, control structures and error handling. Students will learn techniques to design, code, debug, and document programs through hands-on programming projects.

This course continues the development of the principles of a high-level programming language introduced in the Programming Language I course. Topics include: data abstraction, encapsulation, overloaded and overridden methods, inheritance, polymorphism, even-driven programming, and exception handling.

Vectors, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line integrals, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and Stokes Theorem. Applications to physical problems will be given.

Program Outcomes

Students will be able to evaluate current literature by writing article reviews. Article reviews must reflect appropriate grammar, critical thinking, and awareness of the current research areas.

 

Students will be able to write a lab report that will reflect an understanding of the theories, a clear understanding of the procedures, an interpretation of the data, and a reasonable conclusion based on a critical analysis of the data.

 

Students will give at least two presentations (currently this occurs in pharmacology and biochemistry). One of the presentations can include the sharing of their internship experience during one of the major's meetings. Presentations must demonstrate organization, appropriate content, appropriate communication skills, timing, and creativity.

 

Students must be able to analyze/evaluate data correctly. Students will be able to design the procedure of at least one experiment based on the knowledge they have acquired in their courses.

 

Students will also critically evaluate materials from the current research literature. This will be evaluated by the use of article reviews.

 

Students must be able to identify reliable resources for a topic, collect information relevant to the topic, and assess the usefulness of the information

 

Students must demonstrate knowledge of chemistry and related fields in the various areas of chemistry (inorganic, organic, analytical, physical, and one additional career-oriented course of chemistry) as well as in physics and mathematics. The knowledge will be measured by tests, assignments, group projects, and skill demonstrations in labs.

 

Students must be able to identify and apply the math approach needed for solving chemistry and physics problems. This will be by use of word problems on tests and homework, and analysis of data.

 

Students will be able to use appropriate software to assist in their analysis of data. They will show skills in the use of a graphing program and at least 2 other programs before graduation. Evidence of these skills will be assessed via appropriate use in lab reports and homework.

 

The student can explain his/her personal core ethics beliefs, can clearly present the theories that form those beliefs, and can recognize ethical issues in complex situations dealing with science and research.

 

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B.S. in Chemistry

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