Academics
Areas of Study

Overview

Overview

A minor in chemistry is for students with other majors who will be working in fields requiring knowledge of and experience in chemistry lab skills. Minors are trained in the fundamentals of inorganic chemistry and organic chemistry, and may select chemistry electives that suit their future interests and professional needs.

Courses & Requirements

Summary of Requirements

Required pre-minor courses 8 hours

A grade of C or higher in CHE 107 and CHE 109 or a letter of recommendation from our chemistry faculty.

Designed for science majors, this is the first of a two-semester sequence and is designed to help students become familiar with the properties and reactions of matter. This course will also address modern applications of these concepts. Specific topics for this course include: observation of properties and changes, scientific method, unit conversions and measurements, chemical formulas, balancing equations, predicting products and yields, reactions and reaction types, the Ideal Gas Law, thermodynamics, molecular and atomic structure of matter, and orbital hybridization.

A laboratory course to accompany CHE 107, this course enables students to develop skills appropriate to the first-year chemistry course for science majors. Experiments for this course include: observation of properties and changes, measurements, observing activities and reactions for the various types of reactions, obtaining quantitative and qualitative information regarding products, and the use of computer simulations.

This course emphasizes the meaning and application of the concepts of functions. It covers polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions and their graphs, trigonometric identities. Passing both MAT 125 and 126 is equivalent to passing MAT 130.

Required minor courses 12 hours

Designed for science majors, this course is the second of a two-semester sequence and is designed to help students become familiar with the properties and reactions of matter. This course will also address modern applications of these concepts. Specific topics for this course include: chemical bonding concepts, solution chemistry, colligative properties, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, solubility and equilibria, entropy, free energy, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry.

A laboratory course to accompany CHE 108, this course enables students to develop skills appropriate to the first-year chemistry course for science majors. Experiments for this course include: quantifying thermodynamic changes, observing colligative properties, evaluation of chemical kinetics, evaluation of acid/base reactions via titration, and the use of computer simulations.

This course is designed to give an introduction to the chemistry of carbon-hydrogen compounds, also known as organic chemistry. Students will study the structures, properties, synthesis, and uses of organic compounds and learn important classes of organic compounds including alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, heterocycles, carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. Organic reactions will be discussed including addition, substitution, oxidation, reduction, polymerization and synthesis of organometallic reagents.

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence. A functional group approach to organic chemistry is presented, with an emphasis on alkenes, alkynes, aromatic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and amines. Students will study the structures, properties, synthesis, identification and uses of organic compounds and learn important classes of organic compounds and practice use of instrumentation commonly used in organic chemistry. A number of organic reactions will be covered including addition to carbonyl compounds, substitution at carbonyl positions and aromatic positions, oxidation of alcohols and aldeydes, reduction of aldehydes, ketones and other carbonyl compounds, polymerization and organometallic reactions with carbonyl compounds.

A laboratory course to accompany CHE 211. This course consists of one three-hour laboratory session per week. The laboratory covers the techniques for preparing, purifying, analysis and identification of organic compounds. Students will carry out experiments aimed at studying the structures, properties, synthesis, and uses of organic compounds and learn important classes of organic compounds. Students will also learn and use analytical instruments, including the FTIR spectrometer, precision balances, and the GC-MS.

A laboratory course to accompany CHE 212. This course consists of one three-hour laboratory session per week. This class covers the techniques for preparing, purifying, analysis, and identification of organic compounds. Several organic reactions will be covered including addition, substitution, oxidation, reduction, polymerization and organometallic reactions. Students will learn to perform some important organic procedures like Grignard reactions, Ester synthesis, nitration and soap synthesis. Students will also learn and use analytical instruments, including the FTIR spectrometer, GC-MS, and the NMR spectrometer.

Elective chemistry courses 10 hours

CHE 250, CHE 309, CHE 310 and CHE 327: denotes laboratory courses

Ten credits of chemistry courses of the 240-level or above are required.

This course investigates the chemical aspects and applications of forensics studies. The lecture and the laboratory provide a means to develop skills in the following areas: soil analysis and organic analysis, fingerprint analysis and foot print analysis, hair analysis, fiber analysis, physical evidence evaluation, document examination, forensic anthropology, forensic toxicology and drug analysis.

This is the first course of a two-semester course sequence on basic quantitative methods of chemical analysis. This course focuses on basic analytical tools, such as measurements, analysis of experimental errors, gravimetric methods and volumetric analysis.

This is the first laboratory course of a two-laboratory course sequence, focusing on applications of the basic quantitative methods of chemical analysis in the laboratory. The course focuses on basis analytical tools, such as measurements, analysis of experimental errors, quality assurance, gravimetric methods and volumetric analysis. Two three-hour laboratory sessions per week.

This is the second and last course of a one-year course sequence on basic quantitative methods of chemical analysis. The second semester covers instrumental topics, such as potentiometry, spectroscopy, analytical separations, chromatographic methods and quality assurance.

This is the second and last laboratory course of the two-laboratory course sequence, focusing on applications of the basic quantitative methods of chemical analysis in the laboratory. This course focuses on instrumental methods, such as pH, spectroscopy, analytical separations and chromatographic methods. Two three-hour laboratory sessions per week.

Application of modern chemical theories of structures, bonds, and reactions to inorganic substances.

A study of the principles and reactions that involve proteins and DNA in biological systems. The course investigates the structure and chemistry of amino acids, the combination of the amino acids in the formation of proteins, the function and structure of proteins, the building blocks of DNA, the chemistry and structure of DNA, the structure of RNA, the replication of DNA, and current topics in biochemical/biomedical engineering.

A laboratory course to accompany CHE 325. Qualitative and quantitative experiments related to ordinary biological-chemical materials. One three-hour laboratory.

A study of the principles and reactions that occur upon the intake of nutrients (including carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins) in biological systems. The course will evaluate the processes by which nutrients are metabolized. The breakdown of substances taken in from the environment will be studied. This will be followed by an analysis of the reactions that create the molecules necessary and usable by living organisms.

This course is cross-listed and is otherwise known as HSL 785. This course provides the student with a better understanding of pharmacology from chemical and biochemical perspectives. The areas covered in this course include: classifications of drugs, routes of ingestion, chemical and biochemical structures of medications, metabolism of drugs, effects of drugs, and the relationship between the structures of some drugs and the structures of some important chemicals in the body. The course also covers material specifically related to ototoxic medications.

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Minor in Chemistry

Daniel Lundberg

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