Academics
Areas of Study

Overview

A minor in Communication Studies guarantees a student benefits from required classes in addition to one elective of choice. This provides a broad base of theoretical knowledge and practical skills to augment any course of study.

Please contact Marina Dzougoutov for admission to the minor.

Courses & Requirements

Summary of Requirements

Required pre-minor course 3 hours

Introductory survey of the field of communication that includes discussion of the importance of communication in our lives, examination of communication as a uniquely human process of interaction, an overview of the varied contexts in which communication occurs, and investigation of communication as an academic discipline, field of research, and possible career track. This course also provides an introduction to the Communication Studies Department.

Required courses 18 hours

This course will focus on the process of thinking and problem solving in committees and small groups; methods of leading and participating in discussions and conferences.

The course emphasizes the principles involved in the selection and organization of ideas and their effective presentation to a group.

This course will provide for the experiential learning of the elements of effective interpersonal communication. Students will observe, record, and analyze interpersonal transactions; opportunities for improving interpersonal skills will be provided.

This course prepares students to be effective communicators in the workplace and includes interviewing, professional presentations at staff meetings, business writing, and interaction with a variety of professionals.

This course involves a critical study of the development, scope, influence, and theories of mass communication in America.

This is a survey course that covers conceptual approaches to the study of human communication. There will be a emphasis on theories that focus on speaker and message aspects, and the use of communication strategies in the forming, building, and dissolution of relationships through interdisciplinary perspectives.

Required elective minor courses 3 hours

Select one course in consultation with the program

This course will focus on the process of inquiry within human communication. Students are introduced to concepts of framing research questions, conducting literature reviews, developing a research design, using qualitative and quantitative research tools, and interpreting results of research in communication.

In everyday life, we are interdependent with others and face many challenges in interpersonal and group situations. The difference or disagreements in perceptions, goals, needs, or interests can lead to conflicts. These conflicts can develop into positive situations that encourage creativity and new dimensions or they can devolve into negative situations that develop destructive and hurtful behaviors. Because such conflicts occur in daily life, it is important to understand the dynamics of conflict, use effective management techniques, and establish and maintain collaborative relationships. In this course we will use theoretical perspectives, case studies, personal experiences, journals, and class activities to examine the roots and nature of conflict, the styles and tactics used to deal with conflict, and the personal and group stakes in conflict. In addition, we will explore methods for analyzing and handling conflict, techniques for creating constructive conflict, uses of third-party interventions, and possibilities for forgiveness, reconciliation, and thinking of ''conflict as magic''.

This course provides a broad overview of components of public relations in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. Students will examine the concept of public relations as an ongoing process. Students will be exposed to the basic knowledge, skills, strategies, and tools used by practitioners.

This course is cross-listed and is otherwise known as ITS 372. The ability to have access to communications is an important foundation for empowerment of people who are deaf and hard of hearing. This course explores how communication accessibility is achieved through study of current and emerging technology, trends in industry, public policies, and the government agencies that enforce these policies. Access to telecommunications (including Internet and wireless communications, relay services, etc.), information, video media, emergency services, public accommodations, employment, education, and other contexts are included.

Students will study the ways in which beliefs, attitudes, and behavior are affected by communication in this course. The findings of behavioral research and contemporary theories will be employed to demonstrate the workings of persuasion in political campaigns, advertising, and everyday life.

Students in this course will approach public speeches and speech-making based on theory, performance and criticism. Students will both write and deliver their own addresses and learn principles for rhetorical criticism of others' speeches.

A study of the theories and research on the influence of artifacts, appearance, facial expression, gestures, paralanguage, posture, movement, space, time, and touch on human interaction. Opportunities for analysis and application of learned principles through in-class exercises, simulations, videotaped sessions, and original field research.

This course is an examination of communication and gender, including sex role stereotypes. The course provides a survey of how communication of and about gender interacts with various contexts, including biology, culture, family, mass media, education, religion, and the workplace.

An examination of the role played by communication in the bridging and separating of cultures. How norms, values, and expectations concerning the communication act itself differ from culture to culture, and how these differences affect intercultural encounters.

An examination of the persuasive strategies used by mainstream politicians, social activists, and propagandists. Special emphasis is on the rituals and implicit rules of conducting public information campaigns and electoral campaigns, and the relationship among politicians, the voting public, and the mass media that link them.

The role of communication in complex organizations. Emphasis upon the role of communication styles of managers and employees in the creation of corporate culture. Dissemination of messages within and among divisions of organizations. Use of such diagnostic tools as the ICA Communication Audit to identify dysfunctional communication patterns.

Examination of the communication concepts that are fundamental to understanding interaction in the family. Exploration of how communication affects the development, maintenance, and enhancement of family relations.

Students will study the process of arriving at reasons and conclusions; practice in debate; projects in analysis, research, ordering of arguments, and refutation.

Reviews a broad range of critical and theoretical approaches in contemporary visual practices. Students will learn how to find meaning and value in the images and texts that hold power in their world. Employs lectures, field trips and other experiential modes of learning.

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Undergraduate Admissions

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Minor in Communication Studies

Amy Stevens

SLCC 1113

202-559-5755

** By Appointment Only **
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