Academics
Areas of Study

Overview

Bobbi Jo Kite Herbold, BA Program Coordinator
Fowler Hall, Room 301D

Overview

Students who minor in education will be able to choose from an array of foundational education courses. Students will also experience a field experience class.

Requirements for a minor in education:

A GPA of 2.75 is required to enter and continue in the minor.

Courses & Requirements

Summary of Requirements

Required pre-minor courses 6 hours

*EDU 250 must be passed with a grade of B or better

An overview and study of contemporary trends, problems, and issues in general education in terms of educational philosophies, types of educational programs, the relation of education to the individual and society, and curriculum and instruction. Some consideration of the relevance of regular education to special education and education of deaf and hard of hearing students. Discussion of organizations and agencies related to education.

An introduction to the major features of languages and to the structure, use, and variation in the sign languages and sign systems commonly used in the United States. The course will cover four major topics: (1) Language: The nature and definition of languages, the uniqueness of language, and contrasts between language and other forms of communication; (2) Language and Culture: The role of language in human society, with special focus on language acquisition, language identity, and bilingualism; (3) American Sign Language Structure: A survey of the major features of the linguistic structure of ASL. Topics are: Phonology: the structure of the physical signals; Morphology: the basic structure and composition of meaningful units of ASL; Syntax: word order and nonmanual syntactic signals in ASL sentences; (4) Language Variation: Language variation and language contact in the deaf community, including discussions of contact varieties of signing and systems for representing English.

Required Education courses 19 hours

This course is designed to provide students with a foundational understanding of the theories, research and literature in the area of language and literacy acquisition and learning. Students will examine their own beliefs and processes related to language and literacy acquisition and learning. This course will prepare students for subsequent courses that address literacy teaching and learning in the classroom and the home courses.

The course addresses the application of psychological principles to the educational setting. Topics include learning theory, cognition and memory, individualized instruction, human development, intelligence, creativity, exceptionality, motivation, discipline, and measurement and evaluation.

This course provides students with an opportunity to begin their field-based professional training through observations in classroom settings. Students will also have an opportunity to apply concepts learned during their methods courses and reflect on how the experiences support their growth.

This course will familiarize students with the nature and importance of curriculum in education from K-12. The course also provides an initial experience in integrated curriculum planning that incorporates the use of current technologies. Current theories of assessment, curriculum, instruction and learning across diverse educational settings are applied in classroom laboratory settings. Content assessments and evaluation in the candidate area(s) of study are emphasized. Field experience in a school setting is a required part of this course.

This course for teacher candidates specializing in early childhood provides an integration of literacy theory and research, content-based instructional practices, and assessment and evaluation cycles for diverse learners including ASL-English bilingual learners, English language learners (ELL), struggling readers and writers, and students with disabilities. In this course, candidates explore in depth an integrated approach to the study of early childhood literacy, curriculum building, methods and materials for literacy instruction, including language development, reading and writing.

This course for teacher candidates specializing in elementary education provides an integration of literacy theory and research, content-based instructional practices, and assessment and evaluation cycles for diverse learners including ASL-English bilingual learners, English Language Learners (ELL), struggling readers and writers, and students with disabilities. In this course, candidates will expand knowledge and appreciation for literature, model communication in written, oral and/or through-the-air expression, comprehend, analyze, and evaluate a range of print and non-print media appropriate for use in elementary settings; and experience and reflect on effective practices in literacy teaching and learning in elementary settings.

In this course, candidates examine the purposeful social and cognitive processes of adolescent literacy, address instructional issues related to teaching and learning reading and writing in the middle and secondary grades (6-12), practice effective ways to deliver literacy skills for adolescents across a range of domains, with consideration given to motivation, comprehension, critical thinking, and assessment. This course provides the basis in adolescent literacy teaching and learning for teacher candidates who are about to embark upon the student teaching practicum experience in middle and secondary school settings, and requires related field-work.

This course is designed to familiarize students with the identification of exceptional children in terms of developmental needs, interpretation of assessment data, development and evaluation of appropriate intervention strategies for the regular classroom teacher, and legislation in special education. This course will prepare teacher candidates to work with children and youth with a broad range of disabilities and educational needs. Topics will include understanding disability; understanding principles of legislation and curriculum and instruction; establishing positive learning environments; and working collaboratively.

An in-depth study of children's literature primarily for early childhood and secondary education majors. Focuses on the evaluation, selection, and sharing of children's and young adult books in instructional settings. Participants will read, respond to, and evaluate picture books and chapter books of various genres. Emphasizes the identification and teaching of literary elements in context, strategies for sharing books with children, and the importance of using authentic children's and young's adult literature in schools.

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Minor in Education

Bobbie Jo Kite

202-250-2043

202-448-7067

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