Academics
Areas of Study

Overview

Students in the BAI program conduct research projects in the final semester of their studies prior to graduation. Using video and other data, the students analyze specific features of interpreting or translation and then give a public poster presentation of their findings.

See the past presentations from our 2017 BAI graduates below:

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Savannah Hiatt

A Gender Comparison of Non-Manual Eyebrow Usage During Platform Interpreting

View poster.

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Joshua Cauley

Mid-Sentential Pausing: The Effects of a Shortened Processing Time

View poster.

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Paris McTizic

Black Faculty Matters: Are There Enough Black Faculty in Interpreter Education Programs?

View poster.

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Tabatha Podleiszek

ASL Mouthing vs. English Mouthing Used by Female and Male Interpreter

View poster.

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Billy Sims

To be or not to be. An Analysis of “to be” Verbs in English to ASL Interpretation

View poster.

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Aviva Levy

Production of Numbers by Deaf Native ASL Signers and Hearing Non-Native Signers

View poster.

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Lauren Mullahey

Differentiating Between Depiction Use of Deaf Interpreters and Hearing Interpreters

View poster.

India Hitchcock

Interpreting Strategies: Medical Terminology from English to American Sign Language

View poster.

Rodney Lebon

Is There Anyone That Speaks Like Me? An Analysis of Video Text Made for Interpreter Education Programs and the Inclusion of People of Color

View poster.

Past BAI Research Projects:

2016 BAI Research Poster Presentations

2015 BAI Research Poster Presentations

Courses

This course is designed to build basic knowledge and skills of Lengua de Senas Mexicana (LSM) and Mexican Deaf culture. Students are expected to develop basic expressive and receptive skills, through signs and grammar lessons and interactive activities. The visual and spatial language, LSM will be taught with cultural context and brief Mexican Deaf history, as well. This course is designed to teach students the fundamentals needed to initiate and partake in, and understand basic LSM conversations with LSM users.

This course designs to continue the development of Lengua de Senas Mexicana (LSM) and emphasize development and refinement of comprehension, production, and interpersonal skills as well as deepening understanding of Mexican Deaf Culture. The visual and spatial language, LSM II will be taught with cultural context and brief Mexican Deaf history, as well. This course is designed to teach students the fundamentals needed to initiate and partake in, and understand intermediate LSM conversations with LSM users.

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for freshmen. Students may enroll in 195 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

Study abroad in a French-speaking country. The study abroad component will focus on the study of the sign language of the host country through formal class instruction and immersion in the culture of its Deaf community. Classroom instruction will be complemented with guided visits to relevant museums, monuments, and other points of interest.

Study abroad in a Spanish-speaking country. The study abroad component will focus on the study of the sign language of the host country through formal class instruction and immersion in the culture of its Deaf community. Classroom instruction will be complemented with guided visits to relevant museums, monuments, and other points of interest.

Special Topics in the discipline, designed primarily for sophomores. Students may enroll in 295 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

This course provides an introduction to the diversity of human language and the role of language in society. Students will apply basic lexicostatistic methodology to learn about the origins, the interrelationships, and the characteristics of some of the world's languages.

This course provides a multidisciplinary introduction to the plethora of challenges Africa presently faces as a result of its colonial legacy, its economic under-development, its tribalism, and the devastation triggered by wars, AIDS, other diseases, and natural or man-made disasters. The focus of this course is to look for possible answers to the question, "Why does Africa struggle?" Students will apply knowledge, modes of inquiry, and technological competence from the fields of History, Government, Cultural Studies, and Literature to understand the complexity of the issues that shape the lives of people in Africa. Particular attention will be given to the issues that affect deaf Africans. Students will optionally participate in a service learning project in conjunction with and on behalf of Deaf people in an African country of their choice.

This junior-level course provides an effective way for students to integrate theory and practice. Students will apply knowledge, foreign language and cross-cultural skills gained in the classroom by interning at international organizations, agencies or schools in the U.S. or abroad for at least 10 weeks. Depending on the number of credit hours, students will be required to work a minimum total number of hours, and will fulfill the duties outlined in a learning contract developed with their on-site supervisor, their sponsoring organization and their faculty sponsor. Student performance will be assessed via various products (e.g. weekly journals, reflective paper, learning agreements), which will include samples of products or reports completed during the internship in both English and in the foreign language used at the internship site.

An analysis of the changing trends in the development of French literature and culture from the 12th century to the contemporary age through the reading and discussion of selected French masterpieces in English translation. Satisfies the humanities literature requirement.

An analysis of the changing trends in the development of French literature and culture from the 12th century to the contemporary age through the reading and discussion of selected French masterpieces in English translation. Satisfies the humanities literature requirement.

This course introduces students to the diverse culture of Quebec through the study of significant works of literature and film. Literary works are read in English translation and films are viewed with English captions. Works studied are placed in the context of the social, economic and political challenges faced by the largest population in North America that uses French as a primary mode of communication. Special emphasis is given to the concepts of otherness and the quest for identity as they apply to the evolution of gender roles and the interaction between differing ethnic groups. Satisfies the humanities literature requirement.

Comparative study of three of the largest Latino communities in the United States: Chicanos, Cuban-Americans, and Puerto Ricans. Topics will include an exploration of the cultural identities of each of these communities, focusing notions of ethnicity, race, religion, as well as economic and social class distinctions. Taught in English.

This course covers readings from the Medieval and Renaissance periods to Spain's Golden Age plays, Cervantes' Don Quixote, and exemplary novels of the 17th century. This course satisfies the humanities literature requirement.

This course covers readings from the 18th century to the modern works of the 20th century by Pardo Bazan, Perez Galdos, Blasco Ibanez, and Garcia Lorca. The course satisfies the humanities literature requirement.

Readings from major writings of Argentina, Venezuela, Colombia, Mexico, Guatemala, Brazil, and Peru, among others. This course covers the Colonial period to 1950. The course satisfies the humanities literature requirement.

This course is an introduction to the writings of U.S. Latino authors writing in English and/or in Spanglish. Through a close analysis of various genres (poetry, fiction, comic strips, interviews, art exhibits, and films), students will explore the contemporary experiences of U.S. Latinos of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Cuban descent, and how they are represented in American literature. Topics to be discussed include the construction of identities in terms of race, gender, class and sexuality, bilingualism and code-switching, the experiences of migration and exile, and the longing for a place to call home. As part of their learning experience, students will work in teams to develop a lesson plan to educate the community about U.S. Latino author.

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for juniors. Students may enroll in 395 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

Students will learn foreign language teaching and learning techniques and research methods for classroom application. In addition to acquiring knowledge of past language learning theories and principle methodologies, comparisons and discussions of those theories will be applied to current best practices in foreign language teaching and research as guided by the discipline's National Standards for Foreign Language. Learning developed by the national professional organization, the American Council on Foreign Languages. Learning outcomes include evaluation and assessment criteria, student review and the development of student-centered written class work through mentoring and collaboration with department faculty in the students' target language area.

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for seniors who are majors or minors. Students may enroll in 495 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

Intensive supervised study and research on topics of the student's selection.

Independent Study

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2017 BAI Student Research Presentations

Helen Thumann

202-250-2043

202-448-7067

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